Introduction

 

        Some of the first records of families in western Maryland were made in 1787. Much of the land west of Fort Cumberland was under the newly established Maryland State Legislature, having been liberated from British ownership as an effect of the American Revolutionary War. The Maryland State legislature had determined to divide much of the lands west of Fort Cumberland into 50-acre parcels and award them to United States veterans of the Revolutionary War. The survey party, which was led by Francis Deakins, found about 50 families already settled on lots they marked out in what is now Garrett County. Just northwest of what is now the town of Westernport on Big Savage Mountain lived the families of Joseph WarnickGeorge Fazenbaker, Daniel Reckner and a few others.  Fazenbaker and Reckner had recently served on opposite sides in the Revolutionary War, George Fazenbaker having been a Hessian soldier in the service of England and Daniel Reckner having served in the Pennsylvania military.

The remainder of the land that was surveyed, in what is now Allegany County, was more populated, having almost 300 families.  A number of Dawson families lived along the Potomac River between Cumberland and what is now the town of Westernport. The neighborhood in which they lived is still known as Dawson. A Dawson family historian has linked these families with prominent Dawsons in central and eastern Maryland.

Prior to Deakins' survey, many of the early settlers did not own title to the land on which they lived. They were squatters in the wilderness. The primitive conditions in which they lived are foreign to us today. Inevitably, their circumstances profoundly shaped their lives and personalities in ways we cannot fully grasp.

        During the next decades, more families migrated to western Maryland.  Michael Wilt from northern Virginia was living in present-day Garrett County by 1799.   Ultimately, he resided in the Savage River Valley where his brother Peter Wilt came to live for some years around 1820.  Peter was the ancestor of many Wilts in western Maryland today. Before migrating to Maryland, Peter and Michael Wilt, then residents of Virginia, who had volunteered for service against the 1794 Whiskey Rebellion, were related to the Broadwater family who also settled in the Savage River Valley in the early 1800s. 

        Meanwhile, settlers south of present-day Oakland included Revolutionary War veteran Dudley Lee and his second wife, the widow Margaret (Fetters) White.  Dudley came west from Taneytown in present-day Carroll County, Maryland.  While Dudley had been awarded some of the western Maryland bounty land, he did not settle on the parcel he was awarded. Family tradition records that Dudley was encouraged to come to western Maryland by a soldier or officer with whom he served in the War. Indeed, military records show that Dudley served under John Lynn, a prominent citizen of what is now Garrett County.

South of present-day Elk Garden, Mineral County, WV, the William Harvey, Jr., family arrived from Montgomery County, Maryland, sometime between 1794 and 1802.  Eventually, their descendants would raise families in southern Garrett County.

        By 1809, Henry Durst purchased land on the Mason-Dixon line east of present-day Grantsville in northern Garrett County.

        By 1814, Henry Bittinger and his family had come from Pennsylvania and settled on Ridgley Hill, between Grantsville and the present-day town in central Garrett County that bears his surname.  In this same general area, John Burkholder and Jacob Hoover also settled.

        The primary livelihood of all these families was farming.  By the 1840s, however, the development of rail and canal transportation created market value for western Maryland coal.   Mines along Georges Creek prospered, and immigrants flocked to the region.  James Major, accompanied by his wife Mary Sinclair and their young family, came from Ireland via Philadelphia in the 1850s to work the mines around Moscow in Allegany County.  They are my most recent immigrant ancestors. 

  

Garrett County

 

        Garrett County is the westernmost county of Maryland. It is roughly the shape of a right triangle. It is bordered on the north by Pennsylvania and on the west by West Virginia. The long side of the triangle, which runs northeast to southwest, consists of a straight portion which separates Garrett County from Allegany County, and the Potomac River which forms a border with West Virginia.

        The straight portion intersects the Potomac River at the mouth of Savage River at Bloomington. The pioneers Joseph Warnick, George Fazenbaker, Daniel Reckner, and several others were living on Big Savage Mountain a few miles north of present-day Bloomington when Deakins conducted his survey in 1787.

        Between Bloomington and the homeplaces of these pioneers is some of the most rugged country in Maryland; no roads lead north from Bloomington. To travel from Bloomington to the lands occupied by the pioneer settlers, one must travel east to Westernport, Allegany County, Maryland, and then travel northwest where the grade up Big Savage Mountain is less severe.

Upstream along the Potomac from Bloomington, the map notes the abandoned community of "Warnocks." This was the site of a coal mining community founded by the descendants of John Warnick, son of the pioneer Joseph Warnick. John, who was a prominent citizen of this vicinity in the early 1800s, lived here on lands bordering the Potomac.

The Pioneers Joseph and Sarah Warnick of Western Maryland

 

        Joseph Warnick and his wife, Sarah, were the ancestors of the numerous Warnicks of western Maryland. They were among the earliest settlers of what is now Garrett County. They were already there in 1787, when Francis Deakins headed a team that surveyed much of the land "westward of Fort Cumberland."

Deakins surveyed 4,165 50-acre "military lots" to be awarded to Revolutionary War veterans, but the settlers already occupying some of the lots were given a chance to purchase the land at low rates. Altogether, Deakins found 323 families living on 636 lots. Most of these settlers were in present-day Allegany County, but Joseph occupied lots 3836 and 3837 on Big Savage Mountain, in present-day Garrett County. He probably lived on lot 3836.

         This is the earliest record of this couple. Almost 100 years later, information pertaining to Joseph's son William, as recorded by U.S. census takers, noted that Joseph had been born in Ireland.

         With the creation of Allegany County in 1789, courts became more accessible. While little can be reconstructed today of the character of Joseph and Sarah, Joseph left behind extensive public records of his court battles (some of the earliest cases heard in the county), land transactions, estate settlements (probably reflecting unsettled business transactions), and a will naming his heirs. It was noted that Joseph was a weaver.

Judging from tax assessments, it appears that Joseph and his family prospered in their mountain home. In 1798, he was assessed in what was then Upper Old Town Hundred with 4 horses, 12 cattle, "Michael's Wonder" (150 acres), and five military lots. The total valuation was $330, a considerable sum in those days.

          Joseph was involved in the purchase and sale of numerous parcels of land. The records that survive at the Cumberland courthouse are difficult to follow, and a coherent chronology of transactions has not been pieced together.

          The last glimpse of Joseph Warnick is from his will, which was drawn up in 1819. In his will, he named his children: Jane Warnick (probably born before 1788), John Warnick (born about 1788), Samuel Warnick (born about 1789), Elizabeth "Betsy" Warnick (born 3/4/1791), James Warnick (born about 1793), Mary Warnick (born in 1794), Joseph Warnick (probably born about 1796), and William Warnick (born 2/22/1798).

           Joseph was listed as head of household in the 1820 census. He died prior to March 1829, when his will was acted upon. Judging from his age as approximated in the 1800 census, he was probably over 74 years old at the time of his death.

Sarah was listed as head of household in the 1830 census. She died about 1838.

Settling Joseph’s estate remained the subject of litigation until 1844.

The Pioneers George and Elizabeth Fazenbaker

 

        George Fazenbaker and his wife Elizabeth were the ancestors of the numerous Fazenbaker family of America. George was born 8/15/1757 at Heidelsheim in southwest Germany, son of Johann Georg Fessenbecker and Catherine Pleshen.

George was among the "Hessian" soldiers hired by England's King George III to fight against the colonial forces during the American Revolutionary War. The Hessians were deeply resented by the American colonists. In the Declaration of Independence, the fact that the Hessian soldiers were hired and brought to America was cited among the grievances against King George III.

        George Fazenbaker was a private in the 6th Company of the "Jager-bataillons" (that is, the hunter battalions). To be precise, George was not from that part of Germany known as Hesse, but the term Hessian is customarily applied to all the German soldiers hired by King George III.

        Jaegers typically carried special rifles shorter than the Kentucky Rifle. Hessen-Kassel Jaegers were originally organized as a corps of huntsmen and sons of minor nobility. The role of the jaegers was as screening force, not as a main force unit. They were often used for reconnaissance. During engagements with the Americans, they would use their firearms at a distance, and then withdraw to reload and allow the infantry to deal with the close range combat. The jaegers maintained support for the infantry as snipers. They inflicted especially heavy casualties among American officers and NCOs.

        In the German military records, George's surname was recorded as Vesenbecker and Fessenbecker. German records show that George was labeled a deserter with full arms and equipment in April 1781, very near the end of the combat phase of the War. Western Maryland genealogist Wayne Bittinger noted a different account. "A history of Germans in the state of Maryland ... reports that he had been taken prisoner of war and had refused return transportation to Germany." The two accounts, one German and one American, appear to be different perspectives on the same event.

        George Fazenbaker married Elizabeth ----, who was born in the 1750s or 1760s in Germany. Circumstantial evidence suggests that Elizabeth's maiden name may have been Corbus, but proof has not been found.

        George eventually settled in what is today Garrett County. The first known record of the Fazenbaker family in western Maryland was made in 1787, four years after the end of the Revolutionary War. Wayne Bittinger wrote, "By 1787, George had made his way to western Maryland. That year, he was listed as a settler on Military Lot 3869, which is situated on the eastern slope of Big Savage Mountain in present-day Garrett County, two or three miles northwest of Barton, Maryland." This property was part of Washington County at that time, but it became part of Allegany County when it was formed in 1789, and in 1872, it became part of Garrett County. The 1798 Allegany County assessment and the 1800 federal census for Allegany County included George's name.

         On 8/31/1799, George purchased 100 acres--Military Lots 3858 and 3859--on the east side of Big Savage Mountain, two miles west of present-day Barton, MD.

Practically nothing can be reconstructed today about the life of George Fazenbaker in western Maryland. Unlike his Warnick neighbors, he was not litigious. No court cases or estate payments involving George during his lifetime have been found.

George's last will and testament was dated 10/17/1809. The will listed the children of George and Elizabeth: Jacob Fazenbaker (born about the 1780s), Sarah "Sally" Fazenbaker (born about 1789), John FazenbakerElizabeth Fazenbaker (born about 1793), Godfrey Fazenbaker (born 3/2/1795), Catharine FazenbakerGeorge Fazenbaker (born about 1800), Conrad Fazenbaker (born 9/9/1802), and Marcus Fazenbaker (born 12/25/1805).

It may be concluded that George died in late 1809 or, more probably, early 1810, for his will was proven at Cumberland on 5/12yj/1810. He was 52 years old at the time of his death.

In the 1970s, Jack Fazenbaker wrote, "I have located the farm that George the Hessian left in his will. It is now owned by Howard C. Michael and was purchased by Mr. Michael's grandfather in 1856 from George Fazenbaker's son Godfrey. Godfrey Fazenbaker had bought the land from his brothers and sisters after Elizabeth died."

At the time of the 1810 census, George’s widow, Elizabeth, was head of a household of eight people in Allegany County.

At the time of the 1820 census, Elizabeth was head of a household that contained only herself and one male age 16 to 25. On 11/11/1823, Elizabeth paid a sum to the estate of the late James Morrison, Jr.  The reason for the payment was not noted in the estate account. This is the last known record of Elizabeth Fazenbaker.

 

Peter Wilt, Brother Michael, and Broadwater Kin

        Peter Wilt was born 2/15/1775, son of Henry Wilt. Considering Peter's date of birth, we can conclude that Henry was living as late as mid-1774. Henry's wife, whose name in not presently known to us, remarried. Her second husband was Jacob Beavers; their daughter Mary was born in 1782 or 1786.

        Peter Wilt's  military service record shows that he was slated to march from Virginia to fight against insurgents in southwestern Pennsylvania in 1794. This action became known as the Whiskey Rebellion. Peter's record shows that he became ill during the march to Pennsylvania and was left behind. He was given three months pay for the period September 1 to December 1, 1794. The record shows that prior to his discharge, Peter served under the command of Ensign William Clark. This was the same William Clark who would later gain great fame for his leadership role in the Lewis and Clark expedition, which explored the western half of America from 1804 to 1806. Merriweather Lewis was also among the soldiers who marched from Northern Virginia through western Maryland, and on to the site of the Whiskey rebellion near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. President Washington personally reviewed the troops at Cumberland, Maryland. Previously, Peter had served under Col. William Campbell's Regiment of Virginia. Peter was paid $3 per month.

        In August 1795 Peter Wilt was named as a member of his stepfather Jacob Beavers' household in Loudoun County, Virginia. By the end of that decade, Peter had moved to Truro Parish, in adjacent Fairfax County. At the time, Truro Parish encompassed the southern half of Fairfax county.

        Peter's first wife was named Catharine. Their children: George Wilt (born 2/15/1799), Peter Wilt (born 12/14/1800), Thomas Wilt (born 11/13/1802), Lesha(?) Wilt (born 7/3/1805), John Wilt (7/23/1807-1/22/1872), Theophilus Wilt (1809-after 12/18/1883), Nancy Wilt (born 7/20/1812), and William Henry "Henry" Wilt (born 1/19/1814).

        Peter's name first appeared in Truro Parish tax lists on 6/17/1799. He was assessed for two head of livestock in the category "Horses Mares Colts and Mules." He was assessed the same in 1800 and 1802.

        Meanwhile, Peter's brother Michael Wilt, who had completed military service against the Whiskey rebellion,  moved to western Maryland about 1799.

In every annual assessment list from 1803 through 1816, Peter was taxed in Virginia for either three of four animals in the horse classification. In 1814, he was also taxed for one slave over 16 years of age. His total tax that year was $1.42. The 1815 list was the only one during his adult life to make an assessment for cattle. That year, he owned 11 head, and his tax amounted to 96 cents.

        Peter's mother and stepfather Jacob Beavers had two daughters; one of them was Mary Magdalene Beavers who married Charles "Charley" Broadwater. Charles and several of his brothers and sisters followed Michael Wilt and emigrated to western Maryland in the early 1800s.

        Peter's fortunes seem to have been tied to those of his brother Michael, at least for a time. It is known that Peter moved from Fairfax County to western Maryland where he settled on Michael's farm. The exact year of Peter's arrival in Maryland is uncertain, but his name was absent from Truro Parish tax lists in 1817 and 1818, and again from 1821 through 1824. (There is circumstantial evidence that places at least one of his family in Allegany County in 1818. On November 20 that year, a marriage license was issued to one George Wilt, possibly Peter's 19-year-old son. If Peter had moved his family to Maryland by that date, it appears that he returned to Virginia temporarily, as he was again named in Truro Parish tax lists in 1819 and 1820. His assessment those years was uncharacteristically modest; he was taxed for only one animal in the horse category.)  After living for some time on his brother's land, Peter reportedly settled for five or six years on Swamp Ridge, in the vicinity of Pine Swamp Road in present-day Garrett County. This land in later generations was owned by George S. Warnick.

        Peter was quite possibly still an Allegany County resident on 6/8/1824. On that date he apprenticed his two youngest sons, Theophilus and Henry, to his brother Michael. (In addition to being a farmer, Michael was a weaver.) The boys' apprenticeships were to run for six and ten years, respectively, until each, apparently, attained the age of 21 years. Peter was located in Truro Parish within the year, for he was named in the tax lists there on 4/14/1825. Michael Wilt and his wife may not have had children of their own, as no information about any such children comes down to us.

        It is known that Peter's first wife, Catharine, died in Fairfax County. In an 1891 history of the Broadwater family, Amos Broadwater, Sr., said that she was buried "at the Fairfax burial ground." The 1820 census had not included a woman of Peter's generation in his Allegany County household. It is likely, therefore, that she had died between 1814--when her youngest child was born--and 1820.

Amos reported that Peter also died in Fairfax County. The date of his death is not known, but his name never again appeared in Truro tax lists after 4/14/1825. Amos noted that Peter was buried in Fairfax County.

       It is said that Peter's second wife was Jennie Woogit. Nothing more is known of her, but circumstantial evidence exists. To begin with, Jennie may have been in Peter's household in western Maryland in 1820, for there was a female there between the ages of 16 and 26, born between 1794 and 1804. Secondly, one Jane Wilt (the names Jennie and Jane were typically used interchangeably) was head of a household in Fairfax County in 1840, 1850, and 1860.

 

Cornelius Broadwater and Mary (Piper) Broadwater

        Cornelius Broadwater, the ancestor of the Broadwater family of western Maryland, came to America sometime prior to the Revolutionary War. His grandson Amos Broadwater, Sr., wrote of him: "He emigrated from England, but in what town or locality he was born, I do not know. He married and settled in Loudon [Loudoun] County, Va. He married Miss Mary Piper, who emigrated from England likewise. They had eight children ... all whom were born in Loudon Co., Va., about six miles below Leesburg, near Carter's mill."

       Cornelius reportedly died in Loudoun County in 1804. Within several years, Mary and six of her children left Virginia and settled in the wilds of western Maryland.

        It is known that Cornelius's son Charles came to western Allegany County (now Garrett County), Maryland, in 1807, and son Guy settled there about 1811. When Mary came to what is now Garrett County, about 1809, she was accompanied by her youngest child, Sam.

        Others who left Loudoun County at an early date and settled in Allegany County were Jacob Sigler, John and William Michael, George Smarr, Jim Parris, George Layman, and Michael Wilt.

        Jacob Brown, a nineteenth century lawyer and historian of western Maryland, reported that Cornelius and Mary's sons "settled not far from Savage river--a very hilly--even mountainous country, then almost a total wilderness...." "These men in their more early years were strong, active, enduring and lively, not averse to some of the mirths and enjoyments of the old time life."

        Sam Broadwater and his widowed mother, Mary, lived on a property near Russell Road, in what is now eastern Garrett County. This land lies atop Big Savage Mountain, northwest of Barton, Maryland. Cephas Moore, one of Mary's descendants, wrote about Mary some decades after her death, "My Mother [Nancy (Broadwater) Moore] was well acquainted with Her. She loved to talk of Loudon Co., Va. She were lively turned to Joke & tell tales to children."

        It is said that Mary died in October 1838 and was buried in a private graveyard on the Corbes place, along Russell Road.

        Children of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary Piper were Sarah "Sally" BroadwaterElizabeth "Betsey" Broadwater (born about 1777), Charles "Charley" Broadwater (born 4/22/1778), Guy BroadwaterWilliam BroadwaterNancy BroadwaterVirginia "Jennie" Broadwater, and Samuel "Sam" Broadwater.

--THE BROADWATER REUNION--

        Beginning in 1909 and for several decades thereafter, the annual Broadwater Reunion was unrivaled as a social event in eastern Garrett County. The reunion was very well attended, many people regarding it as the highlight of the summer. As the years went by, it seemed that actual descendants or spouses of Broadwaters, or at least those who were aware that they were descendants, comprised a small minority of the attendees.

        At first, the reunion was held at Merrill's Grove near the tiny remote community of Merrill deep in Savage River Valley, the ancestral home of many of the Broadwater clan. Later, the reunion was held at a rustic facility on U.S. Rte. 40 between Frostburg and Grantsville, called the Meadow Mountain Inn. After the Reunion was moved from this location, its popularity dropped dramatically.

        The following article appeared in the Cumberland Evening Times , September 13, 1909, the first year of the Broadwater Reunion.

        Saturday, Sept. 11, was Broadwater day in Garrett County. The reunion held at Merrill Grove was one of the most remarkable events in the county. The weather was ideal and nothing interfered to prevent the Broadwaters from gathering at Merrill's Grove. A conservative estimate of the number present is 800. Fully 90 percent of them were Broadwaters. They came from four states. Virginia and West Virginia sent a hundred or more, and the Broadwaters of Garrett County muster strong, stalwart, farmers, wholesome, hearty matrons and rosey-cheeked maidens. The grandsire hoary and the maiden merry, they were all there.

Bounteous Fare

        The day was given up to social enjoyment, vocal and instrumental music. The eatables were there in enormous quantities and it seemed as if all the chickens in Garrett County had been slaughtered for the occasion. Visitors were welcomed with genuine country hospitality, and introduced to the roast chicken and "fixins" at once. Ample provision had been made to feed this army of Broadwaters and fully a quarter of a mile of tables were loaded with good things to eat. It was a farmer dinner, prepared by farmers' wives. Cooling drinks, ice cream and fruit of all kinds could be had on the grounds. There was a long program of athletic sports, and good music for the dancers. It was a great big picnic.

A brief history

        About the year 1807, four brothers, Charles, William, Guy, and Samuel Broadwater, immigrated from Loudoun County, Va., to Allegany County, Md., and settled where their descendants now reside. Their progeny is numerous. Charles, the eldest, had eight sons and daughter: one of the sons, Amos, married Sarah Sigler. Of that union, 12 children were born and all are living today and were present at this reunion. They are: Mrs. Henry Green, aged 83; William, 81; John, 80; Mrs. Jefferson Green, 71; Jefferson, 74; Mrs. Simon Green, 71; Mrs. Peter Bittinger, 70; Amos, 66; Mrs. Jacob Blocker, 64; David, 62; Mrs. Peter Stevens, 59; and Eli, 57. The sire died six years ago, aged 97. He left 12 children, 98 grandchildren, 111 great-grandchildren, and a regiment of great-great-grandchildren.

       Saturday's gathering was a magnificent demonstration of the sturdy vitality of these stalwart sons of the fearless pioneers who conquered the wilderness, and after long years of unrelenting toil left the children in possession of the land which they had redeemed.

         Among those who went to the reunion from Lonaconing were: D.R. and D. Lindley Sloan, William R. Bradley. Geo. Kirkness and William Picken. It was a great day for the Broadwaters.

        Kirkness, the Lonaconing photographer was on the ground taking pictures of the Broadwaters.

Of English Descent

        The Broadwaters are of English descent and the first of them to cross the ocean - as far as is known - settled at Carter's Mills, Va., shortly before the Revolutionary War and it is believed that two men of the family served in the Continental Army. It is certain that the brothers, Charles and William Broadwater served in the War of 1812, and walked to the Little Savage River from Baltimore after the war was over.

Settled in Garrett early

        The Broadwaters left Virginia because Negro slavery made it impossible for the white man to earn a living as a laborer. They came to Maryland and settled on Little Savage River in what is now Garrett County. Amos Broadwater and Sam Beeman came from Virginia together and built a log shanty on Little Savage, and cut punchons for a floor, but they hadn't the tools to construct a door and for more than a year a blanket hung in the doorway.

Almost a centenarian

        Amos Broadwater died a few years ago, aged 97, leaving six sons and six daughters. The oldest, a daughter, is aged 83. There are scores of grand and great-grandchildren.

A numerous family

        The Broadwaters are a numerous tribe, and every one of them was at Merrill Saturday. Broadwaters met Broadwaters they had never seen before and they were all busy getting acquainted with each other.

The second year of the Broadwater Reunion was even bigger than the first. The following article appeared in The Cumberland Alleganian, Thursday, August 18, 1910.

THE BROADWATERS HAVE REUNION

        Fifteen Hundred Members of One Family on Ground

Were Earliest Settlers

Lonaconing, Md. Aug. 15

        Fully fifteen hundred Broadwaters assembled at Merrill Grove, about a half mile from the town of Merrill in Garrett county, last Saturday. It was the second annual reunion of the Clan Broadwater, and it is safe to say that if any Broadwater stayed at home it was because he, or she, was bedridden, and could not be carried to the muster place. This gathering is one of the most remarkable events in the history of Garrett county. It was a magnificent demonstration of the sturdy vitality of those stalwart sons of the fearless pioneers who conquered the wilderness and, after long years of ceaseless toil, left their children in independent possession of the land which they had redeemed.

Some Fine Addresses

        Duncan R. Sloan and N. V. Bond, of Oakland, spoke to the people, and had a large and appreciative audience, for both of these gentlemen spoke on topics of especial interest to their hearers. Mr. Sloan took for his subject, "The Conservation of the Land, and Why the Boys should Stay on the Farm." Mr Bond talked about the Broadwaters as citizens and neighbors. Both addresses were well received and generously applauded.

        Some of the Broadwaters drifted into West Virginia and there are several families of them in Ritchie county.

        Among the visitors at the picnic were Dr. George Sloan, of Yakima, Washington, Mrs. Johseath Broadwater and Mrs. Sophia Broadwater, from Minnesota, and Mrs. Rachael Boucher, of Centreville, Pa., and Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Ellithorpe, of Bittinger, Garrett county.

        It was very evident that the Broadwaters are a prosperous tribe, and they welcomed their visitors with a hearty hospitality, and gave them a farmer's dinner. There was a program of athletic sports and good music for the dancers. It was a great day for the Broadwaters.

Dudley Lee

 

        Dudley Lee (born between 1756 and 1765), Revolutionary War veteran, is the immigrant ancestor of the Lee family of present-day Garrett County, Maryland. Many of his descendants still reside in the county and elsewhere in Maryland and West Virginia.

        He was born in Ireland, supposedly in 1759. According to family tradition, at the age of 11 he was kidnapped or stowed away on a vessel. Upon arrival in Baltimore he was indentured (sold) by the captain.

       On 6 June 1778 he passed in the vicinity of Taneytown, Frederick Co, MD, as a draft substitute in Colonel Otho Holland William's Regiment, the 6th Maryland. That unit served in New Jersey and New York as part of Washington's army. Dudley continued to re-enlist for the remainder of the war. We have constructed a fairly detailed chronology of his army service, which is only briefly summarized here.

        In August of 1780 he mustered in the 1st Maryland Regiment. This was essentially the same regiment, having been reorganized. By this time, the 1st Maryland was in the Carolinas, under the command of General Nathanial Greene. The regiment took part in most of the major actions of Greene's Southern Campaign. Following Cornwallis' surrender at Yorktown, the 1st MD was eventually furloughed in Baltimore and finally disbanded in November of 1783. Perhaps around this time Dudley made the acquaintance of Judith Guevara, his first wife, supposedly a Spanish or Portuguese lady of Baltimore. The surname Guevara was passed down as a given name in subsequent generations.

        In the 1790s, Dudley and Judith, then living in Frederick County, near Taneytown (in present-day Carroll County), appear several times in the documentary record...in the census, deeds and a newspaper. By 1800 Dudley appears in the census of Allegany County. Supposedly Judith had died by then and Dudley's second wife was the widow White, the former Margaret Fetters. If Dudley bought land in Allegany County, the deed eludes us, as does any evidence of land-owning among the early Lee generations. Together with White families, Dudley settled in Ryan's Glade south of present-day Oakland.

        With his two wives, Dudley is said to have sired 19 children, though this total may include step-children through his second wife. The web of these various off-spring has not been entirely untangled and is further complicated by the children of an unrelated Lee family of Allegany County (which soon migrated to Ohio) who appear in marriage records.

       Dudley last appears in the 1810 census. In 1811 he was awarded a pension by the State of Maryland. He died in 1815 and, according to tradition, was either buried near the White Church or on his farm in that vicinity. In modern times, Dudley's descendant Charles Lee erected a memorial in his honor about a mile from the White Church.

 

William Harvey, Jr., and Margaret (Bell) Harvey

        William Harvey, Jr., was born March 22, 1744, in Prince George's County, Maryland, son of William Harvey, Sr., and Statia. By 1764, he had moved with his parents to Frederick County (now Montgomery County), Maryland.

On September 19, 1770, he married Margaret Bell, who lived on Bennett Creek. She was born in April 1751. Their known children: Samuel Harvey (born 8/18/1770), Elijah Harvey (born 3/3/1772), Hezakiah Harvey (born 5/10/1774), Rezin Harvey (6/19/1778), Gazaway Harvey, and Zachariah Harvey.

        The Harvey home became part of Montgomery County when it was formed from Frederick County in 1776. The county was named in honor of General Richard Montgomery, one of the first American generals to be killed in the American Revolution.

        In 1778 the Maryland Assembly passed an act to prevent the spread of Toryism. The act required that an Oath of Fidelity to the State be taken on or before March 1, 1778 by all free males above the age of 18 who were not already engaged in military service. Severe penalties were inflicted upon those who failed to comply. Both William Harvey, Jr., and William Harvey, Sr., took the Oath and made their marks.

        A 1783 statewide Maryland tax list named the father and son. William Harvey, Jr., owned two horses and five black cattle. The value of his real estate and personal property totaled 17 pounds 9 shillings, somewhat less than the average for those listed. William Harvey, Sr., owned property valued at 19 pounds.

        On October 13, 1789, William Harvey, Jr., bought 44 acres of a huge tract of land called "Trouble Enough." This is the earliest deed we have been able to locate involving William Harvey, Jr. In this deed the junior is written out, which definitely distinguishes him from his father. They apparently lived quite near each other. "Trouble Enough" was located between Damascus and Clarksburg in Montgomery County.

        Toward the end of the century the constant use of the soil for the cultivation of tobacco had depleted the soil to where it no longer yielded an increase. The population of Montgomery County decreased from 18,003 in 1790, to 15,058 in 1800. Montgomery land became a synonym for poverty. From 1790 on there was a constant stream of emigration from the county.

        Today, tobacco is no longer extensively cultivated in Montgomery County. The general area where the Harveys lived is now devoted principally to residential use. For several decades, dairy and beef farming remained, but, in recent years, farms raise mainly corn and soy beans. A very large county park called Bennett Regional Park occupies much of the area.

        William Harvey, Jr., purchased his father's property on March 26, 1794. On this same day he resold his property to a James Sherlock for "one hundred and one pounds current money." In this deed William Harvey, Jr., signed his name with his mark (X). Why did he sell his property at this time? Did he desire to emigrate? One can only guess.

        Sometime between 1794 and 1802, William Harvey, Jr., and his wife and at least four of his sons emigrated to Hampshire County, Virginia, now Mineral County, West Virginia. On September 10, 1802, he bought a 146 acre farm for "seventy-five pounds current money of Virginia." This farm was located on a ridge running north and south between Emory Creek and what is now a road extending south between Emoryville to the Northwestern Turnpike. Today, Emoryville is a small village of forty inhabitants, and is located about 3 miles south of Elk Garden, West Virginia.

        In 1827 William Harvey, Jr., sold his farm to his son Elijah. By this time he was 83 years old. ...No further information has been obtained concerning him.

Henry Durst and Barbara (Garlitz) Durst

 

        Henry Durst, son of Casper Durst and first wife, Anna Elizabeth, was born in Pennsylvania about 1769. He married Barbara Garlitz and lived for a time near Salisbury, in Elk Lick Township. Barbara was born about 1762. On 5/13/1789, Henry was confirmed at the Reformed church in Salisbury. The 1790 census included "Hendrey Dust" and his household in a list with known Elk Lick Township residents.

        Children of Henry Durst and Barbara Garlitz:

(1) a daughter? (possibly born in 1790 or before).

(2) Margaret Durst (born 3/22/1791). Married William Wiland.

(3) Christian "Christly" Durst (born about 1792). Married Hannah Wiland.

(4) a daughter? (possibly born in the 1790s.

(5) Casper Durst, Sr., (born in 1796 or 1797). Married 1) Catharine Bittinger, daughter of Henry Bittinger and Barbara "Barbary" Bauser and 2) Matilda Durst, daughter of Jacob Durst and Nancy Wiland.

(6) Adam Durst (born about 1800). Married Susanna Nymoyer.

(7) Henry "Bridge Henry" Durst (born in March 1802). Married Mahala Young.

(8) Solomon Durst (born 1/6/1805).

(9) Sarah "Sally" Durst (born about 1807). Married Peter "Pete" Bittinger, son of Henry Bittinger and Barbara "Barbary" Bauser.

(10) Barbara Durst (born 1/4/1808). Married Henry Baker.

(11) Elizabeth Durst (born about 1812). Married Joseph "Joe" Bittinger, son of Henry Bittinger and Barbara "Barbary" Bauser.

(12) Mary Ann Durst (born about 1816). Remained single.

       

        Henry owned land in Elk Lick Township as early as 2/20/1799. On that date, his brother John bought a piece of property in the township which was bounded on one side "by land of Henry Durst." In 1800, Henry was head of a household in this township. County assessments taxed him for land there in 1800 (50 acres), 1801 (50 acres), 1802 (60 acres), 1803 (60 acres), 1805 (115 acres), and 1806 (115 acres). During most of these years, he owned two horses and two head of cattle.

        On 1/20/1807, Henry sold 100 acres "on the Waters of Meadow Run," in Elk Lick Township. Four days later, he and his wife, Barbara, sold 65 acres of a tract called "Bell View," also located on Meadow Run, in the township. (This second property had been purchased by Henry on 5/27/1803.) He and Barbara were township residents in 1807.

         On 6/5/1809, he purchased a parcel of land on the Mason-Dixon line in western Allegany County (now Garrett County), Maryland. This 150-acre tract lies north of the Stone House, which stands along Alternate U.S. Route 40 about three miles east of Grantsville.

        Henry's name was added to Allegany County tax lists in 1810. He was assessed in the "Sandy Creek & Glades Hundreds," which approximates present-day Garrett County. He was assessed for three horses ($60 total value), six head of cattle ($30 total), $10 worth of other personal property, and 150 acres. His name also appeared in that year's Elk Lick Township assessment; he was taxed for 50 acres, but no horses, cattle, or houses. The 1810 census located Henry "Dust" in what is now northern Garrett County.

        Henry was the first person to ride a horse across the great stone bridge over the Casselman River, east of Grantsville. All things considered, this ride can be taken as an act of courage. The bridge is a "semi-circle arch of great width and height," and at the time of its construction in 1813 or 1818, it was the longest stone arch in the United States--spanning 80 feet. The public sentiment was that when the supporting timbers were taken away, the brand-new bridge would collapse. The bridge held firm, however, when the "key" to the wooden framework was removed; the bridge stood while Henry Durst made his ride; and the bridge stands today--a monument to 19th century engineering.

        During the period 1813-1824, Henry was taxed in Allegany County's District No. 2, which is now part of northern Garrett County. He was assessed for two horses ($45 total value), seven head of cattle ($45 total), and $15 worth of other personal property. He and his wife sold their 150-acre tract on 2/8/1814.

On 4/24/1817, Henry "Dust" bought 200 acres of the resurvey of "Desert," a tract of land between Ridgley Hill and the present town of Grantsville. He paid $800 for this property, much of which consists of the bottomland along the Casselman River. A large part of this section of the tract is included in "The Maples," recently owned by Guy S. Stanton, Sr. Henry was apparently living on his 200-acre property in 1820; his close neighbors included Eli Ridgely and Henry Bittinger. Four people in the Durst household were working in agriculture that year.

        Henry's name was included in a list of men who voted in an election held at Tomlinson's Mill in western Allegany County (now Garrett County) in September 1821.

        Henry may have left "Desert" prior to 4/20/1822; Peter Beachy was the owner of the 200-acre section of the tract on that date. During the period 1825-1832, Henry was assessed for the following in District No. 2: two horses ($30 total value), four head of cattle ($18 total), and $56 worth of other possessions.

Census records suggest that the Henry Durst family was living on Maynardier Ridge, 3 1/2 miles south of "Desert," by 1830. On 7/16/1835, Henry bought 105 acres at Maynardier Ridge from Henry Maynadier of Annapolis, Maryland. This property was part of two tracts, "The Lily of the Valley" and "The Eastern Vale." The Durst household was located in this area in 1840.

        Henry Durst died at Maynardier Ridge in the early 1840s. Part of his land was sold by his heirs on 7/13/1844; the remainder was sold by the heirs in 1848. The deeds for these transactions listed the "legal heirs of Henry Durst," including "Barbara Durst widow of Henry Durst," and John and Mary Custer; Mary was possibly Henry's grandniece. The remainder of the heirs may be presumed, by legal convention, to have been Henry and Barbara's children and their spouses. At the time of Henry's death, his land on Maynardier Ridge totaled a little over 146 acres.

        Barbara was still living as late as 7/12/1850. On that date, census records listed her as a member of her grandson Joel Wiland's household, near Grantsville. Both Barbara and her husband were reportedly buried in the cemetery on the land they had owned at Maynardier Ridge. The cemetery is located on the section of this property now owned by Mrs. Earl Burow.

Henry Bittinger and Barbara "Barbary" (Bauser) Bittinger

 

        Henry Bittinger was born July 14, 1778, son of Philip Bitner and Juliana Philippina ---. He was baptized in 1779 at the Reformed and Lutheran Union church at Berlin, in Somerset County, Pennsylvania. On November 1, 1795, 17-year-old Henry "Bittner" was confirmed into the Lutheran faith at the church at Pine Hill, Somerset County.

        Young Henry Bittinger spent some time in the part of the Northwest Territory that is now the state of Ohio. Jacob Brown [the northern Garrett County historian of the late 1800s] wrote of Henry: "He had some experience with the Indians in the Northwest in his early life, but the nature or particulars of which cannot now be given. He used to say he had 'tough times with the yellow buggers.'" (The American Indian in Henry's day was sometimes considered to be colored yellow, instead of red.)

        Jacob Brown could not give particulars of Henry's dealings with the Indians, but, fortunately, traditions of these matters have been preserved by Henry's family. A short biography of his grandson Thomas H. Bittinger states that Henry "settled in Ohio, where he often assisted local regiments in fighting the Indians." Henry's granddaughter Lydia (Bittinger) Brenneman reported that he was a scout and an Indian fighter. Lydia said that there was an occasion when he lived with an Indian tribe. Extensive accounts of some of Henry's Indian experiences are included in the genealogy.

        Henry married Barbara "Barbary" Bauser of Somerset County, Pennsylvania, who was born in 1772. It is likely that Henry and Barbara were married in Somerset County, for their families were next-door neighbors there. Judging by the birth of their eldest-known child, they were married about 1799. Their children: Peter "Pete" Bittinger (7/17/1800-10/3/1857), Catharine Bittinger (3/4/1802-8/8/1858), Daniel Bittinger (1/6/1804-about 1879), Henry Bittinger, Jr.(?) (possibly born 12/4/1805), Joseph "Joe" Bittinger (about 1807-about the 1870s), a son(?) (born possibly between 1810 and 1820), George Bittinger (between 1810 and 1815-12/14/1846), Jonathan "Jonas" Bittinger (5/14/1814-6/6/1895), Solomon H. Bittinger (5/14/1814-12/27/1871), William H. "Bill" Bittinger (4/24/1817-12/9/1862).

        Henry and his wife apparently lived in Brothersvalley Township during the first seven years of their marriage, up to about 1806. There is also some evidence that they spent at least part of the next eight years in Ohio.

         Henry eventually settled in western Allegany County (now Garrett County), Maryland. On March 9, 1814, "Henry Bedinger of Somerset County" made an agreement to purchase a 200-acre tract at Ridgley Hill in western Allegany County. This agreement stated that he would pay $250 to Benjamin Duvall, Sr.; this sum was divided into a down payment and a number of notes that came due at later dates. One point in this agreement which caused Henry a good deal of trouble was the fact that he was to receive a deed for the property only after he completed his payments.

        This property lies midway between Grantsville and the present-day Bittinger crossroads. It contains some bottomland along the North Branch of the Casselman River, but most of it lies along the southwest side of Ridgley Hill. In addition to having some nice fields and a year-round spring of water, the property had a large stand of sugar maples.

        Jacob Brown wrote that Henry lived for years in a log house there, "where he mostly raised a large family of children, nearly all sons, all hardy and capable of great endurance." Henry's new neighborhood was typical of the area that is now Garrett County: There were few people; the land was hilly, rocky, fertile, and thickly forested; wild game--including bear, deer, panther, and wolf--abounded; and there were long, severe winters and both late and early frosts.

        In 1815, Henry's name was added to Allegany County tax lists. He had not yet paid for his land and was only taxed for his personal property: two horses ($60 total value), one head of cattle ($8), and other items not described ($20).

The payment of the notes on the Bittinger homeplace may have made for some lean years while getting established in the Maryland wilderness. In addition, the year 1816 brought rugged weather throughout the northeastern United States [and indeed in northern latitudes around the world. The huge volcanic eruption of Tambora in Indonesia deposited such a great cloud of dust into the atmosphere that worldwide weather was affected. The year 1816 became known as the year without summer.] David Harrison Friend (1825-1916), who was born and raised in what is now Garrett County, reported on local conditions: "The spring and summer of the year 1816 were cooler and more frosty than the citizens had ever known; it is said there was more or less frost every month of that year. There was very little sound corn raised here that season, and farmers had to go to the South Branch of the Potomac River to buy corn."

        In 1817, Henry was assessed for only one horse ($25), three head of cattle ($14 total), and $10 worth of other personal property.

        Jacob Brown gave a description of Henry Bittinger and of events that likely took place a few miles from Ridgley Hill at one of the inns along the National Road that passed through the northern part of the county: "The old father was industrious, honest and orderly, with no disposition to indulge in disturbances, which in his time were only too common. Yet on field days he could enjoy sport and even help to make it; could dance a jig in a barroom with considerable vim with moccasined feet and the accompanying hunting shirt approaching the ankles, when enlivened by the music of Henry Durst, H. Hare and Aaron Ramsey...."

        Between the date of Benjamin Duvall's death in 1820 and the 1825 county assessment, Henry apparently paid Benjamin's heir Edward Duvall the last notes on his land at Ridgley Hill. In the 1825 tax list, Henry was assessed for his 200 acres, as well as one horse (valued at $15), three head of cattle ($18 total), and $15 worth of other personal property.

        As it turned out, Edward Duvall refused to give Henry a deed for the Ridgley Hill property. To obtain the title to his land, Henry filed suit at the courthouse in Cumberland, Maryland. Jacob Brown wrote that "this land called the plain old farmer to Cumberland, a place he never before or afterwards saw. The object of the trip was to obtain a deed for land. He fell into the hands of the 'scribes,' to be a little plainer--lawyers."

        "He came home in a very ill-humor about his 'teet' [deed] for which he had to pay a lawyer 'tin tollars' for writing it, when John Layman [a local justice of the peace] could make just so good a one for one 'tollar.' It is safe to say he never paid another legal fee. That one was enough for de whole family.'"

After about a year, during which legal notices in Henry's behalf were placed in a newspaper, the Duvall heirs were ordered to convey to Henry "a Good & Sufficient Deed" for the property.

        In the meantime, Henry had sold his farm, together with livestock and household goods, to his son Daniel for $600. This sum was to be paid in installments to the other Bittinger heirs after Henry's and Barbary's death. Henry and his wife reserved a life interest in the dwelling house. The land subsequently was owned by Daniel's brother George.

        During the 1830s, Henry and Barbara left Ridgley Hill and settled on a tract of land farther up the Casselman River. By 1841, local documents were referring to "Henry Bidingers" property as a landmark for assigning work on the road that is now Maryland Route 495. This land was presumably the four 50-acre Military Lots that Henry later owned, a tenth of a mile south of the present-day Bittinger crossroads; Maryland Route 495 cuts across this tract. Henry obtained title to the property in 1844, purchasing it from Jacob Brown's brother Henry Brown. The land was known as "Briar Patch."

        In spite of the unattractive name of this property, it is clear that Henry Bittinger had purchased a good piece of land. The "Briar Patch" lay along the top of a very broad ridge that is unusually flat, by Garrett County standards. Henry and Barbara sold their land in pieces to two of their sons, in return for cash and a life interest in part of the eastern half of the property.

        Jacob Brown said that Henry lived on the "Briar Patch" for "the remainder of his life and died about the year 1852." The family cemetery on the homeplace at Ridgley Hill was in existence at the time of Henry's death, and it is reasonable to suspect that he, as well as his wife, might have been buried there. The cemetery is located in the yard on the south side of the present Butch Bittinger house. None of the graves are marked with lettered stones. Barbara presumably died in the 1850s.

John Warnick and Martha "Patsey" (Wilson)

 

        John Warnick was born about 1788 in what is now Garrett County, MD, son of Joseph Warnick and Sarah. On September 25, 1810, he married Martha "Patsey" Wilson who was born about 1789.

        John and Patsey owned a Bible in which the birth dates of their children and other key dates were written. The Bible, now very fragile with portions of some pages missing, is preserved by their descendants. Their children: Samuel Warnick (6/28/1811-?), Sarah Warnick (9/3/1812-?), Harriet Warnick (6/11/1814-?), Joseph Warnick (11/4/1815-1890), William Warnick (5/21/1817-?), Rebecca Warnick (4/10/1819-4/3/1833), Rhoda Warnick (?-7/16/1841), Jane Warnick (10/22/1822-?), Isabella Warnick (2/2/1824-11/19/1894), John Warnick (7/29/1826-1855 or 1856), Andrew Jackson "Squire" or "Jacky" Warnick (8/29/1828-9/21/1901), Martha Warnick (3/31/1830-?),and Rachel Warnick (6/29/1832-?).

        John was involved in several land transactions while he was still a young man. From 1813 to 1815 John purchased various interests in land that today is part of Westernport, Maryland. He sold his interests in 1816 for a small profit.

A particularly curious transaction was his purchase in 1817 of 420 acres from his father Joseph for $800. In January 1818, John sold these same parcels back to his father, also for $800.

        On April 15, 1818, John purchased from Daniel McIntosh 168 acres bordering on the Potomac in Hampshire County, Virginia (now West Virginia). On November 22, 1819, John purchased a 50 acre Maryland Miliatary Lot 68 from Daniel McIntosh for $100. This is the land that he settled upon and is marked on ancient maps as "Warnocks Farm." As reported in a 1938 newspaper article by Garrett County's most prominent historian of that time, John Warnick settled on "Warnick's farm," near the Potomac and about two miles below Chestnut Grove.

        This property is also about two miles south of John's parents' home on Big Savage Mountain. These two miles cover some of the most rugged country in Maryland. Today, the area between the two Warnick settlements includes the massive pulp and paper manufacturing facilities of Westvaco, which opened in the 1880s. Since John Warnick's days, the area has been transformed by a huge industry which has employed and continues to employ dozens of John's descendants until it closed in May 2019.

        John Warnick must have been a prominent citizen of the Bloomington area for he was chosen as one of five "Trustees of the Union Meeting House at Mouth of Savage River." John Templeman owned 2+ acres in Bloomington which he agreed to donate to the inhabitants of the community for a meetinghouse and a graveyard. A deed was drawn up and signed on January 24, 1824, but it stipulated the condition that John Warnick and the other four trustees must complete the meetinghouse in 18 months.

        The trustees not only failed to record the deed, but they also did not complete the meetinghouse to Templeman's satisfaction, so Templeman drew up a second deed wherein he spelled out what was to be done to finish the building. The floor was to be tongue and grooved, the door and windows were to be finished and a flight of stairs and benches were to be installed. Templeman allowed another 18 months for this work to be completed. This deed was recorded on October 11, 1828.

        In those days, schools were organized and paid for by the voluntary contributions of time and money by local citizens. In 1828 the voters of Allegany County, which then included present-day Garrett County, defeated by a vote of more than 4 to 1 a proposition to establish county primary schools. Thus, private arrangements like that involving John Warnick and Templeman were the only place children could be educated.

        The Bloomington historian of the 1970s noted that the cemetery mentioned in Templeman's deed was given to the people of Bloomington, but any church or school has faded from memory. The suggestion was made, however, that the building was the "old store adjacent to Mrs. Edith Beard" which was still standing in 1976.

         Under circumstances which cannot be understood from the meager records surviving at the Cumberland Courthouse, John Warnick and George Smarr filed suit against Templeman. Warnick and Smarr apparently had a valid claim, but Templeman died before the case was tried. Templeman left "a large real estate," so Warnick and Smarr petitioned the court to sell the real estate to raise the amount due. Legal notices were published in the newspaper "The Cumberland Civilian" several times in 1835.

        Over the years John was named in a number of estates, either as a recipient of moneys or as an administrator. In 1822 John received a payment from the estate of Patrick Hamill (father of the Maryland congressman of the same name) and in 1824 John received a payment from the estate of William Sigler. We know nothing of the circumstances that led up to these payments. In 1835 John was the administrator of the complicated estate of John Morrison which was not completely settled until there had been ten separate accountings spread over ten years. Later, John was the administrator of the estates of Ebenezer Davis and Daniel Cresap.

        John Warnick also had a distinguished career as a part-time jurist. He was appointed justice of the peace in 1828, reappointed in 1829 and 1830, appointed magistrate in 1836, and appointed a justice of the District Court in 1840 from Allegany County District No. 1. Two other men were appointed justices from District No. 1 in 1840. One of these was Meshach Browning, famous hunter and, later, author. In his memoirs, Browning stated that the purpose of the appointment was "to assess the taxable property of Allegany County." Browning indicated that he and the "two other gentlemen" spent a significant amount of time away from home while they were involved with the assessment. "After the assessments were made, we hired a competent clerk to make out our books for the Levy Court."

        In 1828 John and Patsey had their eleventh child and Andrew Jackson was running for president of the United States. John left a permanent record of his feelings about the election by naming his new son Andrew Jackson Warnick.

 

        John Warnick died on April 25, 1857 without having made a will. At the time of his death he owed large sums of money to several creditors, mostly his children or other relatives. The debts were incurred within the last few years of John's life, suggesting, perhaps, that John was borrowing money to sustain himself during a prolonged illness. John also had large land holdings. Getting the estate sorted out required 10 years of legal maneuvering which is recorded in 20 pages of text in Equity Case 1359 at the Allegany County Courthouse. Surviving John were 11 children and his widow. Perhaps it was the practice of the day, but the widow was mentioned only once and then by an acquaintance giving a deposition. She apparently got no real estate as the children forced a sale and distributed the property among themselves. By the time the case was finally settled, Patsey would have only a few years to live.

         John's debts included $200 to his son-in-law Thomas Bernard recorded in an 1854 note; $100 to the same son-in-law recorded in an 1855 note; $400 to his son Samuel recorded in an 1856 note; $100 to his son Samuel recorded in an 1854 note; $46.57 to his son Joseph recorded in an 1854 note; $92.75 again to his son Joseph recorded in 1853; $184.42 to William Warnick (his son?): and another $100 to Samuel recorded in a note that had changed hands.

        John Warnick's property was sold at public auction in Cumberland on August 27, 1864. Here is what was sold: "Onion Patch" containing 100 acres (sold for $705) which had once belonged to his father Joseph; one half interest in "Inskip Resurvey" containing 167 7/8 acres; and "Warnicks Resurvey" containing 342 acres. Together the latter two parcels brought $1,725 at the auction. Soon after the sale the highest bidders sold the lands to Patrick Hamill. After the debts and expenses were paid, John's 10 surviving children each received $47.15. and the three children of the younger John Warnick (since deceased) split the same amount between them.

        Patsey made her will on June 2, 1867. In her will she named her grandson Joseph W. Warnick as the principal recipient of her estate. Patsey's will reads as follows:

I, Patsy Warnack of Allegany County in the State of Maryland, being feeble in body, but sound and disposing mind, memory and understanding, do hereby publish this my last will and Testament in manner and form following. That is to say, after my debts and funeral charges are paid.

I give and bequeath unto Randolph Warnick (Son of Jos W. Warnick) one feather Bed and Bedding, and one cow. The balance of my property that may be on hand at my death, Bed, Bedding, household or Kitchen property, cattle. hogs, farming utensils, in fact all property of any description that may belong to me at the time of my decease, I give and bequeath unto Joseph W. Warnack, my Grand Son, it may seem out of order but I here give my reasons for so doing. The said Joseph William Warnack, my Grand Son, has been to me a kind and obedient boy, and done all he could for my comfort and is well entitled to what little property of mine that may be on hand at the time of my death, what is here set over to Randolph Warnick, excepted.

In Testimony whereof I hereunto set my hand(?) and Seal this 2nd day of June 1867.

        Grandson Joseph W. Warnick and three witnesses appeared before the Registrar on May 18, 1869, to testify that the will was valid.

Samuel Warnick and Keziah (Ross)

 

        Samuel Warnick was born about 1789 in what is now Garrett County, MD, son of Joseph Warnick and Sarah. In 1807, he purchased Military Lots 3854 and 3855 from Nicholas Holsbury. These lots are located about 1/2 mile northeast of land owned by Samuel's father, Joseph.

        Among the properties closest to Samuel's were Military Lots 3848 and 3849, owned by William Ross. The next year, Samuel married Keziah (spelling varies) Ross, a daughter of William Ross and a sister of James N. Ross who married Samuel's sister Elizabeth Warnick in 1814. Keziah was born in 1785. The marriage license for Samuel and Keziah was dated 6/10/1808. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. William Shaw on 6/12/1808. Whether Samuel and Keziah actually resided on Samuel's lots is not known, but about 1810 or 1811, William Ross died, and Samuel sold his lots in 1811 and his share of the Ross estate in 1813.

        Samuel had a large tract of land surveyed along Savage River in 1824 which he called "Warnick's New Settlement." He sold this land to his brother 5 Joseph Warnick.

        Samuel and Keziah spent the last years of their married lives on Military Lots 96 and 97 which lie along Maryland Route 135, west of present-day Bloomington.

        After Samuel's early death about 1828, Keziah apparently raised the family, as she was head of household in 1830 and 1840. Keziah's granddaughter, Ida Warnick Duckworth, related the story that Keziah made do by taking produce to Cumberland on horseback. On one trip home, Keziah was traveling after dark and was being followed by a wildcat. Keziah was afraid to dismount and she worried about how she was going to let the bars down to cross the fence, but her horse resolved the problem--it simply jumped the bars without any instructions from Keziah.

        Keziah died 8/2/1877 at the home of her son, also named Samuel Warnick. According to her obituary in the Allegany Citizen, 8/19/1877, she was a Baptist and sometimes preached. One year before her death, the obituary reported, she mounted a horse unaided. She got "second sight" (a sort of sixth sense compensation for bad eyesight). When she died "she had over 50 descendants including John Bevers of Savage Mtn." The obituary also stated that Keziah was 104 years old at the time of her death, but this is doubtless in error.

        The mention of John Bevers in the obituary arouses curiosity today, but satisfying answers cannot be provided. In 1877, John filed a complaint in Garrett County seeking to gain a portion of Keziah's estate. He claimed that his mother, Johanna Beavers, nee Warnick, was a daughter of Samuel and Keziah. John stated that his mother had died about 1853 and was overlooked among Keziah's heirs. Records in Garrett County do not show how this claim was adjudicated. In the 1930s Samuel's heirs were selling Samuel's Military Lots 96 and 97; the heirs did not include descendants of John Bevers.

        Hoye and Turner wrote about this family in 1938. Their article stated that Lots 96 and 97 lie on the old State Road (MD Rte 135) about three miles above Bloomington. His log house was on Lot 96, on the South Side of the road opposite one of the old taverns. Samuel and Kezia Warnick are buried in the family graveyard just above the site of their house.

        The children of Samuel and Keziah Warnick: John Warnick(born about 1810), Vincent O'Neal Warnick, Jane Warnick (born 6/28/1814), Rachel Warnick (born about 1817), Mary Warnick, Henry Warnick, and Samuel Warnick(born about 1825).

Jane "Ginny" Warnick, wife of William Robinson"

 

        Jane "Ginny" Warnick, wife of William Robinson"

Jane "Ginny" Warnick was a daughter of Joseph Warnick and Sarah. She married William Robinson. The license was dated 6/11/1806. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. William Shaw on 7/7/1806.

        Ceph Moore wrote in 1886, "William Robinson lived on the onion patch. His wife were a Warnick, Jinnie Warnick. She died on onion patch."

Although all of Joseph's other children were named in various court proceedings to settle his estate in the 1840s, Ginny was not. By that time one of Ginny's brothers was living on the property known as the Onion Patch. The last-known public record to mention her was her father's 1819 will.

Elizabeth Warnick, wife of James N. Ross

 

        Elizabeth "Betsy" Warnick was born 3/4/1791, daughter of Joseph Warnick and Sarah. She and James N. Ross obtained a marriage license on 9/2/1813 or 9/2/1814. James was a brother of Keziah Ross who married Elizabeth's brother Samuel Warnick. James and Keziah were children of William Ross.

        When William Ross died about 1812, his estate was distributed to Robert Ross, Henry Ross, Joseph Ross, Samuel Warnick, Alexander Ross and James N. Ross. These appear to be the sons and son-in-law of William Ross. We know from 1810 tax records that William Ross owned several pieces of property. Two of the parcels were Military Lots 3848 and 3849 which were located about 1 1/2 miles from land owned by the pioneer Joseph Warnick.

        A document entitled "Moore History Written by Ceph Moore in 1886" contains a brief reference to this couple: "Old Mrs. Amos Broadwater went to school first to old Mr. John Leach and next to old Mr. Benjamine Braidy & some to old Mr. James Ross that married Betsy Warnick. This Mr. Ross were called Wormey Jim Ross." Evidently, James Ross was a schoolteacher.

        Concerning this couple, the following account was written in 1841 when the estate of the pioneer Joseph was being settled following his wife's death: "Elizabeth Ross and her husband James Ross have since separated, the said Elizabeth resides in Allegany County, Maryland, and the said James Ross resides in the State of Ohio."

        Information collected by the Ross family historian states that James' brother Alexander also went to Ohio. James N. Ross was not listed in Elizabeth's household in the 1840 census, so the separation occurred before then. (Neither Elizabeth nor James was found in the 1830 census.) In 1844 it was written that "Elizabeth Ross who still lives has children and are now living in Allegany county."

        The 1850 census listed Elizabeth as head of a household including John Ross age 24, Mary Ross age 27, William Ross age 22, and Elizabeth Ross age 4. We know that William Ross was a son of Elizabeth but there is no further information concerning the family relationships of the others. One might speculate that John was another son; Mary could just as easily have been either a daughter or the wife of John or William. Subsequent census and other records indicate that John married Elizabeth Michael on 11/16/1852 and had children Jane (b-1866) and Sampson (b-1867). There may have been other children of Elizabeth.

        Elizabeth died 4/24/1868.

James Warnick" (Wilson)

 

        James Warnick was born about 1793, son of Joseph Warnick and Sarah. Concerning the estate of James Warnick's father, Patrick Hamill gave a deposition on 4/26/1844 in which he noted that James was living on his father's 433«-acre plantation. In 1850, James was living with Jemima Poland, age 39, and her children, Louisa (age 9), Allegany (age 7) and Missouri (age 5).

        James died 9/9/1852. At the time of the 1860 census, Jemima was living in an almshouse. At the time of the 1880 census, she was living with the family of James' brother Joseph's son Ashford Warnick; she was reported to be Ashford's mother-in-law. If this notation is correct, Jemima would have been the mother of Ashford's wife Catharine Jane (Barnes) Warnick, daughter of John (or Jonathon) B. Barnes.

Mary Warnick, wife of Elijah Howell

 

        Mary Warnick was born in 1794, daughter of Joseph Warnick and Sarah. She married Elijah Howell who was born in 1782. The license was dated 9/6/1809. Elijah was the son of William Howell and wife, Mary, who were pioneers of western Maryland.

        Elijah Howell was listed as head of a household in the 1810 census, close by his father's household. When the elder Howell died, Elijah was the executor of the estate, which was distributed 10/15/1811. In his will, which was made in 1807, William Howell named his wife, Mary; sons Elijah, Levi, Peter, James, and David; and daughters Catherine wife of Benjamin Fields, Anna wife of John McNeil, Phebe wife of James Stagg, and Susannah wife of Benjamin Brain. The two witnesses to the will were William's neighbors George and Jacob Fazenbaker. The estate contained Military Lots 3876 and 3916 which are separated from Joseph Warnick's property by only a few hundred yards. The two lots and all other property were willed to William's wife Mary during her lifetime and, thence, to son Elijah. The other children received five shillings each.

        The Elijah Howell family may have been living in Pennsylvania in 1812, for the second oldest child, William, was born in that state that year, according to subsequent census records. The next six children were born between 1814 and 1829 in Maryland; the 1820 Maryland census lists the family in Allegany County.

        The family was living in the Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio, at the time of the 1830 census. (Harrison County lies in eastern Ohio about 50 miles west of Pittsburgh, PA.) The youngest child was born in Ohio in 1833. In 1840 and again in 1850, the family was located in German Township, Harrison County, Ohio.

In 1841, Joseph Warnick's estate was taken to court to facilitate sale of the real estate, and Mary and Elijah received their share while still living in Ohio.

On 3/11/1841, Elijah and Mary appeared before a judge of the court of common pleas in Harrison County, to sign the deed to the two Maryland lots Elijah had inherited from his parents. Elijah and Mary received $325 for the 100 acres of land. The deed, recorded in Allegany County, MD, indicates that Elijah and Mary made their marks on the documents, rather than signing them. The land was sold to Jacob Miller of John who in that same year purchased other land from members of the Warnick family.

        Mary died 9/11/1863, age 68. Elijah died 6/27/1871, age 89

Children of Elijah Howell and Mary (Warnick): Joseph Howell (born 6/24/1811 in Maryland), William Howell (born in 1812 in Pennsylvania), Mary Howell (born in 1814 in Maryland), James Howell (born in 1819 in Maryland), John Howell (born in 1821 in Maryland), Samuel Howell (born in 1824 in Maryland), a daughter (born in 1827 in Maryland), Lorenzo Howell (born in 1829 in Maryland) and David Howell (born in 1833 in Ohio).

Joseph Warnick and Elizabeth (Fazenbaker)

 

        Joseph Warnick was son of Joseph Warnick and Sarah. The younger Joseph obtained a license to marry Elizabeth Fazenbaker on 10/10/1815. While no direct information has been found concerning the year that Joseph was born, his brothers and sisters were born between the mid-1780s and 1800, and Joseph was probably also born in this time period. His wife Elizabeth was born about 1793. She was a daughter of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker who served in the Revolutionary War for the British side. Elizabeth was a sister of Catharine Fazenbaker who married Joseph's brother William Warnick.

        Elizabeth's father was a settler on Military Lot 3869 when Francis Deakins conducted his survey for the state of Maryland in 1787. The Fazenbaker farm was about two miles north of land owned by the pioneer Joseph Warnick. By 1799, George came to own two other Military Lots, 3858 and 3859, which were less than 1/2 mile northeast of some of the pioneer Joseph's property.

        Hoye and Turner wrote about Joseph Warnick in 1938: Joseph Warnick, Jr., settled on "Warnick's New Settlement" of 400 acres, which was surveyed for Samuel Warnick, 7th June 1824, and patented to him 19th January 1831. It is described as "lying at the head of a run called Bear Pen Run." This settlement was west of Savage River and about three miles south of the present village of New Germany. There was evidently a considerable settlement on this tract at the time of the survey in 1824; the survey notes "2 cabins, 2 small cabins, a flax house, threshing floor (no roof), 1 covered pen (the bear pen) 5886 rails." Samuel appears to have sold his settlement to his brother Joseph. the "New settlement" is now included in the Savage State Forest.

We know that Joseph's widow owned five Military Lots in this same area of Garrett County (i.e., 3882, 3883, 3884, 3885, and 3886). These lots are located around the upper reaches of the impoundment behind Savage River Dam, which was built in the early 1940s.

        Joseph died 2/17/1867. Living with his widow Elizabeth in 1870 were her son Joseph Warnick, age 36, and two of her grandchildren. In 1876 Elizabeth willed her five Military Lots to Ashford "Warnack," Joseph "Warnack," Silas "Warnack," and Jane "Broadwaters." The census records showing son Joseph living with Elizabeth, the pension application of Ashford naming Joseph and his other brothers, and other information show that the three men were some of Elizabeth's sons. The evidence that Jane was a daughter of Elizabeth is circumstantial. Jane's Civil War pension file confirmed that her maiden name was Warnick, and her inclusion in the 1876 deed suggests that she was Elizabeth's daughter. At least one of the Elizabeth's other children, Mary, who was not named in the deed, had previously moved away from the area.

        The children of Joseph and Elizabeth included: 4.1 Jane Warnick (born about 1817), 4.2 Mary "Polly" Warnick (born about 1820), 4.3 Emily Warnick (born 5/17/1824), 4.4 Ashford Warnick (born 2/12/1827), 4.5 Silas Warnick (born 12/12/1830), and 4.6 Joseph "Blind Joe" Warnick, Jr. (born in the mid-1830s).

         The historical record of this family is sparse. While an Allegany County marriage license shows that Mary Warnick married Thomas Wilt, and subsequent records of this couple have been found, it is only family tradition, as recorded by Fazenbaker cousin, the late Mary Rowe, that places Mary Warnick in the family of Joseph Warnick. Since the births of Joseph's six children are spaced so far apart, it is possible that Joseph and Elizabeth had other children missing from this list. Indeed, the 1820 census listed three young girls in Joseph Warnick's household. Two of these were probably 4.1 Jane Warnick and 4.2 Mary "Polly" Warnick. Perhaps another of these daughters was Mandana Warnick, who was living with 4.6 Joseph "Blind Joe" Warnick, Jr. at the time of the 1880 census. It has been reported to the author that Mandana was another of the children of 4 Elizabeth (Fazenbaker) Warnick, and that she married Tom Clark. Nothing more is known. Mary Rowe's record of family tradition also records a daughter Nancy who married a Gilpin, but no public record of such a person has yet been found.

        Elizabeth died 4/24/1868.

William Warnick and Catharine (Fazenbaker)

 

        William Warnick was born 2/22/1798, son of Joseph Warnick and Sarah. He married Catherine Fazenbaker; their license was dated 2/3/1817. Catherine was born about 1801. She was a daughter of Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker who served in the Revolutionary War for the British side. Catherine was a sister of Elizabeth Fazenbaker who married William's brother Joseph Warnick.

        In 1844, a deposition concerning the estate of William's father, the pioneer Joseph Warnick, stated that William possessed the "Onion Patch," part of Joseph's estate. The "Onion Patch" contained about 150 acres three miles from Lonaconing. It had formerly been the home of William's sister Jane (Warnick) Robinson. Subsequently, the Onion Patch would come to be owned by his brother John Warnick.

        Elizabeth's father was a settler on Military Lot 3869 when Francis Deakins conducted his survey for the state of Maryland in 1787. The Fazenbaker farm was about two miles north of land owned by the pioneer Joseph Warnick. By 1799, George came to own two other Military Lots, 3858 and 3859, which were less than 1/2 mile northeast of some of the pioneer Joseph's property.

        In 1860, five of William and Catherine Warnick's grandchildren were living with them: Susan and Jane Warnick, children of son Joseph; and John, Jefferson, and Thornston (spelling is nearly illegible), children of daughter Elizabeth who also resided in the household. The surname of Elizabeth and her children was given as Warnick, but it was listed as Keyes in later census records.

At the time of the 1870 census, William and Catherine were the only two members of their household.

In 1880, 83-year-old William was living with his daughter Elizabeth Keyes in Barton. Catherine was not listed and may have died by that time. It was recorded that William's father was born in Ireland. This is the earliest assertion found by this writer that the pioneer Joseph Warnick came from Ireland.

        Scharf's History of Western Maryland reported in 1882 that William was the oldest resident of Barton. He would have been about 85 at that time. Ceph Moore wrote in the 1880s that William Warnick died on Friday 1/1/1886, age 87 years, 10 months and 9 days. Ceph recalled that William was an old acquaintance of his father, Levi Moore (11/15/1807-2/28/1883), and mother, Nancy Broadwater (11/10/1813-1/19/1892). An old Bible record in the family of 2 Elizabeth Warnick Ross noted that William died 1/15/1886, thus differing by two weeks from the date recorded by Ceph Moore.

        The children of William and Catherine: Joseph W. "Elbow Joe" (born in February 1827), James (born about 1828 or 1829), Elizabeth (born about 1830, 1832, or 1835), Mary Jane (born about 1834), and William (born 11/21/1837).

Jacob Fazenbaker and Elizabeth "Betsy" (Reckner)

 

          Jacob Fazenbaker was born about the 1780s, son of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. On 1/17/1808, he married Elizabeth "Betsy" Reckner, daughter of Daniel and Sarah Reckner. Daniel was a veteran of the Revolutionary War. (His War records spelled the surname "Ricknor.") According to genealogist Wayne Bittinger, Daniel "enlisted in the Continental army at Allentown, Pennsylvania, in April 1778, for a term of three years. He was a private in Capt. William Oldham's Company of the 5th Pennsylvania Regiment and was present at the battles of Brandywine and Monmouth. He served in the army until the spring of 1781, and was discharged at Reading, Pennsylvania."

        By 1787, Daniel Reckner had settled in western Maryland not far from the home of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. Daniel owned as much as 334 acres of land. His home place, which was probably where daughter Elizabeth was raised, was in the vicinity of Westernport Road north of the head of Aaron Run. In recent years a new military grave marker has been placed at his homeplace on Big Savage Mountain.

        Elizabeth's birth year is not reliably known. The 1870 census suggests about 1785, pension records relating to her husband's military service say about 1785 and also about 1789, and the 1850 census suggests about 1790. The pension records note that she and Jacob Fazenbaker were married in 1808 but also give the year as 1809. According to a contemporary, Charles Broadwater, they were married "in George's Hills in Allegany County...at the residence of the said Elizabeth's father."

        At the time of the 1810 census, Jacob Fazenbaker was head of a household that included four people. That census did not list the names of household members other than the head, but it did include the age brackets of each household member. An adult male and an adult female in the household were presumably Jacob and Elizabeth. There were also two males under age 10, but because the records of this family are so sparse, it requires an uncomfortable degree of speculation to ascribe names to these young boys.

        Jacob must have been respected by his neighbors, for he was a witness to the will of William Ross in 1807 and of William Howell on 10/15/1811. The Ross will was also witnessed by Jacob's father George Fazenbaker.

        Jacob served in the War of 1812 against Great Britain. Congress declared war on 6/18/1812, but for the next two years Great Britain was preoccupied with fighting Napoleon in Europe. When Napoleon was defeated early in 1814 and following U.S. attacks on Canada, Britain redeployed its forces and seriously threatened the United States for the first time. In all probability, it was this threat that caused Jacob Fazenbaker and many others to enroll in the army 8/11/1814 at Cumberland. Jacob was a substitute for one John Mathews. His pension record shows that he served as a corporal in Peter Connor's Company of Infantry, 1st Regiment Maryland Militia. Jacob's pay was $10 per month. Other soldiers also claimed to serve under Peter Connor, a local citizen. (The author's search of various data sources about veterans of the War of 1812 has failed to find Connor's service record. Recently, another family historian has suggested that the surname might have been recorded as "Colmer" rather than Connor, but this suggestion has not yet been pursued.)

 

        British forces were already en route to Washington, DC. They ascended the Patuxent River in southern Maryland and from there 4,000 troops traveled by land to the nation's capital. At that time, President Madison was in the field with the American army. Still at the White House, First Lady Dolly Madison got word of the imminent fall of Washington, so she secured some of the most important White House papers and fled. On 8/24/1814, the British sacked and burned the Capitol building and the White House. During this time, the seat of the U. S. government was temporarily relocated to the small Quaker town of Brookeville in Montgomery County, MD.

        Having achieved their mission in Washington, the British returned to their vessels, sailed back to the Chesapeake Bay and headed toward Baltimore. The British attack on Baltimore was repulsed 9/12/1814. Among the memorable historical facts about the attack on Baltimore is that Francis Scott Key composed The Star-Spangled Banner during the battle at Fort McHenry.

        The same British forces then sailed around Florida to the lower reaches of the Mississippi River where they undertook the capture of New Orleans. The British threat thus removed in the East, Jacob Fazenbaker was discharged from the army 10/10/1814 at Baltimore. He had served only 61 days, but this was enough to qualify his wife Elizabeth for various benefits years later.

        Britain and the U.S. signed a peace treaty at Ghent 12/24/1814, but communications were so poor in those days that the news did not reach all the combatants for some time. In particular, the British expedition in New Orleans precipitated a fierce battle on 1/8/1815. The British suffered huge losses. General Andrew Jackson led the U.S. troops, and his stunning victory over the British made him a national hero.

        This branch of the Fazenbaker clan had strong connections with the military. Jacob's father George Fazenbaker was a soldier in the Revolutionary War on behalf of the British. Jacob's father-in-law Daniel Reckner served on the American side in the Revolutionary War. Jacob saw duty in the War of 1812. And at least three of his sons (John Fazenbaker, Andrew Jackson Fazenbaker, and George Washington "Jona" Fazenbaker), two sons-in-law (William Layton, husband of daughter Elizabeth Fazenbaker; and Peter Layton, husband of daughter Mary Fazenbaker), and five grandsons served in the Union army during the Civil War.

        On 5/10/1817, Jacob sold to his brother Godfrey Fazenbaker the share of Military Lots 3858 and 3859 which Jacob inherited from his father. Godfrey paid $100.

        At the time of the 1820 census, Jacob was head of a household of eight people. That census did not record the names of the people in the household other than the head, and it has not been possible to plausibly reconstruct the family at this time. The only adult male, age 26 to 44, was presumably Jacob; the only adult female, age 26 to 44, was Elizabeth. In addition there were one male age 10 to 15, one male age 0 to 9, and four females age 0 to 9.

During this period, Jacob received money from certain estates, but the circumstances are now lost to history. For example, Jacob received money on 8/13/1822 from the estate of William Sigler. He received funds on 6/10/1823 from the estate of William Barnes, smithy, who had made his will 5/8/1821.

        In the 1820s, Jacob and Elizabeth were increasing their family and in 1828 Andrew Jackson was running for president of the United States. Jackson had a very different background from the previous six men who had held the office of president. Unlike his predecessors, Jackson had not been born to wealth and gentility, but rather was an entirely self-made man. He had a rough-and-tumble background, gaining a reputation not only from his daring exploits in the War of 1812, but also from the duels he had fought. The wave of populism that swept the country caused a great deal of concern among those interested in preserving the status quo. Elizabeth and Jacob, who, like Jackson, was a veteran of the War of 1812, left a permanent record of their feelings about Jackson by naming a new son Andrew Jackson Fazenbaker.

         Jacob and Elizabeth named their last son after President Washington. By the time Jacob and Elizabeth were middle age, they had named two sons after two of the seven people who had served as president up to that time. Evidently, Jacob and Elizabeth were proud patriots.

        At the time of the 1830 census, Jacob was head of a household of 10 people. Like the 1820 census, the 1830 census did not record the names of the people in the household other than the head, and it has not been possible to reliably reconstruct the family at this time.

        When Elizabeth's father Daniel Reckner died about 1829, his sons George Reckner and John Reckner were named administrators of the estate; they paid certain amounts to Elizabeth wife of Jacob Fazenbaker. For example, the fifth account was paid on 1/9/1833.

        At the time of the 1840 census, Jacob headed a household of five people. While that census did not record the names of the people in the household other than the head, it did record their age brackets. In Jacob's household were: 1 male age 50 and under 60 (Jacob himself), 1 male age 10 and under 15; 1 male age 5 and under 10 (probably George W. "Jona," born in the early 1830s); 1 female age 50 and under 60 (probably Jacob's wife Elizabeth); and 1 female age 10 and under 15. Among Jacob's children, some, like son John had already formed households of their own. The census reported that one person in the household was involved in agriculture.

         At the time of the 1850 census Jacob was no longer head of household. His wife Elizabeth, youngest son George W. "Jona," and he were living with the family of William Broadwater and his wife Rebecca (Green) in their home along Savage River. There were also four of William and Rebecca s children living in the household who were young adults. William and Jacob had served at the same time and at the same places during the War of 1812, and may have previously been close neighbors. History records that William was a sawmill owner along Savage River, but he was also remembered as a farmer.

        Jacob died 3/22/1852. Beginning in 1855, Elizabeth applied for various federal benefits by virtue of Jacob's service in the War of 1812. Her pension applications confirmed much information of interest to family historians, such as Elizabeth's maiden name and marriage date. On 4/2/1855, Elizabeth filed a claim for bounty land which the Congress had recently made available. Among the files supporting her claim were affidavits submitted by 67-year-old William Broadwater, the sawmill owner and farmer with whom she and her husband were living in 1850, and James Smith affirming that Elizabeth was who she said she was. William said that he saw Jacob frequently, including when he served in the War of 1812. He contended that Jacob and Elizabeth had raised a large family of children in the neighborhood where William resided. Jacob had died a few miles from William's residence about three years previous, and Elizabeth still lived there. Charles Broadwater, age 71, filed an affidavit attesting that Jacob and Elizabeth had married at Elizabeth's father's home at "George's Hills." Both Charles and William made their marks on these documents. The pension file at the National Archives in Washington, DC, is not clear whether Elizabeth was awarded bounty land.

        At the time of the 1870 census, Elizabeth was living in the household headed by 22-year-old grandson Jacob Shriver, son of daughter Mary (Fazenbaker) Shriver Layton, near Westernport.

        In 1871, Congress passed a law that granted a pension to widows of veterans of the War of 1812, and Elizabeth first applied on 12/12/1871. To be eligible for a pension, the law specified that the applicant had to show that she was married to the veteran before 2/17/1815, that she remained in "widowhood," (i.e., she had not remarried), that the veteran had served a minimum of 60 days in the military, and that the claimant "remained loyal," presumably a reference to sympathies in the Civil War. Proving these claims required Elizabeth to gather a number of affidavits from various government officials over the next several months, such as by postmaster P. Goodwin of Barton, who served the area where Elizabeth lived. Uriah Duckworth, a Justice of the Peace, affirmed that he had seen the marriage records of Reverend William Shaw, which were then in the hands of A. B. Shaw, grandson of Reverend Shaw. The marriage date was 1/17/1808 (although Elizabeth had filed other papers contending that the date was 5/10/1809). Jesse Chaney and Henry Creutzberg affirmed Elizabeth's loyalty. These same two gentlemen would later assist Elizabeth's son George Washington "Jona" Fazenbaker, daughter-in-law Jennie Fazenbaker, and many other local veterans with their Civil War pension applications, and Chaney would board and employ Elizabeth's grandson William Fazenbaker. Elizabeth's application was approved and she received a pension of $8 per month.

         She died in April 1880.

         There remains much uncertainty about the number and names of the children of Jacob Fazenbaker and his wife Elizabeth. The following list is a compilation from a variety of sources: William Fazenbaker (born about 1810), John Fazenbaker (born within several years of 1810), Ann "Annie" Fazenbaker (born in 1817), Grace Fazenbaker (born about 10/5/1823), Elizabeth Fazenbaker (born about 1827), Andrew Jackson "Jack" Fazenbaker (born in the 1820s), Mary Fazenbaker (born in the 1820s), and George Washington "Jona" Fazenbaker (born in the 1830s). There could well have been other children.

Three daughters of this family married men with the surname Layton. Daughter Grace Fazenbaker married John Layton; daughter Elizabeth Fazenbaker married William Layton; and daughter Mary Fazenbaker married Peter Layton as her second husband. Whether there was any kinship between the Layton men is not known. Some or all of these men might be connected to the family of James Layton which resided in the vicinity. A Layton family historian would perform a welcome service by researching the Laytons.

        Charles E. Hoye, in his 1938 Mountain Democrat article on the Fazenbakers, listed four sons of Jacob Fazenbaker--John, William, Alvey, and George--but omitted the name Jack (Andrew Jackson "Jack" Fazenbaker). No record of an Alvey of this generation has been found, but it may be appropriate to speculate that Hoye's source may have had Jack in mind, mistakenly applying a form of the name of one of Jack's own sons, Alban, with whom Jack's widow, Jennie, lived the last years of her life.

Sarah "Sally" Fazenbaker, wife of Henry Clouse and John Barnes

 

        Sarah "Sally" Fazenbaker was born about 1789, daughter of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. On 3/9/1806 at the Methodist Church in Cumberland, she married 1) Henry Clouse. At the time of the 1810 census, Henry Clouse was head of household in Allegany County. He received payment from the estate of James Evan on 10/13/1810.

        According to family tradition passed down by great-granddaughter Daisy Lamb through ggg-grandaughter Harriott Ivers of Beaumont, Texas, Henry and a son were killed when a bridge collapsed. Most of the features of the family tradition passed down by Daisy that can be checked appear accurate. For example, family tradition correctly recorded Sally's maiden name and the number of her children.

        When Henry died, James Morrison, a prominent local citizen, became the administrator for the estate. We do not know the date of the first accounting, but the second accounting occurred 8/30/1820, and one Elizabeth Fazenbaker, believed to be Sally's widowed mother, received a share. On 1/22/1823, Elizabeth received the substantial sum of $116.57 from Henry's estate. Neither the second nor the third accountings mentioned Henry's widow Sally, who by then had married again. Today, it is a historical curiosity that Henry's widow did not receive funds from the estate, while his mother-in-law did.

        On 6/3/1817 according to the Clerks Office of the Circuit Court of Allegany County, or on 6/9/1817 according to the Marriage Diary of Reverend William Shaw, deacon of the Methodist Episcopal Church 1792-1813, Sally married 2) John Barnes. John, who was born about 1788, was a son of William Barnes, smithy. John became the legal guardian of Sally's four children: Elizabeth Clouse, George Clouse, Philip Clouse, and "Julianna" Clouse. John had previously married Nancy Broadwater (license obtained 1/9/1813 at Cumberland), daughter of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary. John and Nancy had had a daughter Sarah "Sally" Barnes who was born about 1814. Sally Barnes married 1) William Sigler and 2) David Evans.

        When John's father William Barnes died in the early 1820s, John was one of the administrators and William's estate paid an account to brother-in-law Jacob Fazenbaker, among others.

        Sally inherited a share of her father's estate. On 2/7/1828, Sally together with her brothers GeorgeConrad, and Marcus Fazenbaker sold their interest in their father's two Military Lots to brother Godfrey Fazenbaker.

        At the time of the 1840 census, John Barnes, Sr., headed a household of 12 people in Allegany County. That census did not record the names of members of the household other than the head, and it has not been possible to reconstruct who was in the household at that time.

        At the time of the 1850 census, John and Sally were living in Allegany County. Sally died 10/10/1852. On 8/8/1853, John obtained a marriage license to marry Charity Broadwater, daughter of Guy Broadwater and Susanna Reckner, widow of James McIntire. We do not know when John died, but on 4/20/1859 one Charity Barnes, who may have been John's widow, was named in an Allegany County marriage license with William Gitterny.

        The extensive Civil War pension file for Samuel Major, husband of John and Sally's daughter Mary Ellen (Barnes) Fazenbaker Major, was a key resource which made it possible to include many of the children of this family. Children of Sally and John Barnes: Nancy Barnes (born about 1818); John Barnes (born about 1820); William Barnes (born about 1822); Joseph Barnes (born about 1825); Eliza Barnes (born 4/1/1826); Jefferson Barnes (born about October 1827); Benjamin Barnes (born 7/11/1829); and Mary Ellen Barnes (born 3/8/1833).

John Fazenbaker and Mary "Polly" (Atkinson)

 

        John Fazenbaker was presumably born about the early 1790s, son of George Fazenbaker.

         Western Maryland historian Charles E. Hoye reported that John married in Ohio and had two children. John's wife was Mary "Polly" Atkinson. Marriage records of Coshocton County, OH, show that they were married on 12/4/1818.

He was still in Coshocton County in 1820, for in the federal census of that year he was head of a household there; the surname was spelled Fasenbaker. The household contained one male age 26 to 45 (John), one female age 16 to 26 (presumably John's wife Mary), and two females under age 10 (perhaps John's daughters). John was engaged in commerce, but not agriculture.

        No further record of John or his family has been found. Specifically, a book of marriages in Coshocton County listed no other Fazenbakers, a recent book of Coshocton County cemetery markers records no Fazenbakers, and John's name is not found in any other federal census for Ohio, the surrounding states or states westward of Ohio.

Elizabeth Fazenbaker, wife of Joseph Warnick

 

         Elizabeth Fazenbaker was born about 1793, daughter of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. She was named on a marriage license with Joseph Warnick on 10/10/1815. The church register of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Cumberland, recorded the marriage of Joseph Warnick and Elizabeth "Fessenbaker" under the date 10/22/1815. Joseph was a brother of William Warnick who married Catharine Fazenbaker.

         Elizabeth's father, the pioneer George Fazenbaker, was a settler on Military Lot 3869 when Francis Deakins conducted his survey for the state of Maryland in 1787. The Fazenbaker farm was about two miles north of land owned by Elizabeth's future father-in-law Warnick whose given name was Joseph, just like Elizabeth's future husband. By 1798, George Fazenbaker came to own two other Military Lots, 3858 and 3859, which were less than 1/2 mile northeast of some of the pioneer Joseph Warnick's property. In those days before the automobile, paved roads, or trains, the usual circumstance was for spouses to come from the same neighborhood.

        On 2/16/1833, Elizabeth's brother Godfrey Fazenbaker had a deed recorded which described Elizabeth's sale of the share of military lots 3858 and 3859 which she inherited from her father. The deed is unclear whether Elizabeth received $100 from Godfrey, or whether she split that amount with her sister Catharine.

        Hoye and Turner wrote about Joseph Warnick in 1938: "Joseph Warnick, Jr., settled on "Warnick's New Settlement" of 400 acres, which was surveyed for Samuel Warnick, 7th June 1824, and patented to him 19th January 1831: it is described as "lying at the head of a run called Bear Pen Run." This settlement was west of Savage River and about three miles south of the present village of New Germany. There was evidently a considerable settlement on this tract at the time of the survey in 1824; the survey notes 2 cabins, 2 small cabins, a flax house, threshing floor (no roof), 1 covered pen (the bear pen) 5886 rails.' Samuel appears to have sold his settlement to his brother Joseph. The "New settlement" is now included in the Savage State Forest."

        Joseph's widow owned five Military Lots in this same area of Garrett County (i.e., 3882, 3883, 3884, 3885, and 3886). These lots are located around the upper reaches of the impoundment behind Savage River Dam, which was built in the early 1940s after Hoye and Turner wrote their article. These lots may have comprised the home farm on which Joseph and Elizabeth lived, for they were located in that immediate vicinity.

        Joseph died 2/17/1867. Living with his widow Elizabeth in 1870 were her son Joseph Warnick, age 36, and two of her grandchildren. In 1876 Elizabeth deeded her five Military Lots to Ashford "Warnack," Joseph "Warnack," Silas "Warnack," and Jane "Broadwaters." The census records showing young Joseph living with Elizabeth, the pension application of Ashford naming young Joseph and his other brothers, and other information show that the three men were some of Elizabeth's sons. The evidence that Jane was a daughter of Elizabeth is circumstantial. Jane's Civil War pension file confirmed that her maiden name was Warnick, and her inclusion in the 1876 deed suggests that she was Elizabeth's daughter. At least one of the Elizabeth's other children, Mary, who was not named in the deed, had previously moved away from the area.

        Children of Joseph and Elizabeth: Jane (born about 1817), Mary "Polly" (born about 1820), Emily (born 5/17/1824), Ashford (born 2/12/1827), Silas (born 12/12/1830), and Joseph "Blind Joe," Jr. (born in the mid-1830s).

The historical record of this family is sparse. While an Allegany County marriage license shows that Mary Warnick married Thomas Wilt, and subsequent records of this couple have been found, it is only family tradition, as recorded by the Fazenbaker family historian Mary Rowe, that places Mary in the family of Elizabeth (Fazenbaker) Warnick. Since the births of Elizabeth's six children are spaced so far apart, it is possible that Joseph and Elizabeth had other children missing from this list. Indeed, the 1820 census listed three young girls in Joseph Warnick's household. Two of these were probably Jane Warnick and Mary "Polly" Warnick. Perhaps another of these daughters was Mandana Warnick, who was living with Joseph "Blind Joe" Warnick, Jr. at the time of the 1880 census. It has been reported to the author that Mandana was another of the children of Elizabeth (Fazenbaker) Warnick, and that she married Tom Clark. Nothing more is known. Mary Rowe's record of family tradition also records a daughter Nancy who married a Gilpin, but no public record of such a person has yet been found.

Godfrey Fazenbaker and Anna "Annie" (Myer)

 

        Godfrey Fazenbaker was born 3/2/1795, son of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. On 6/11/1819 in Allegany County (or 6/17/1819, according to an entry in daughter Julia Ann's Bible), he married Anna "Annie" Myer who was born 4/30/1802. Reverend Adam Sigler performed the ceremony. Annie was the daughter of Peter Myer and Anna Peters. The Myer pioneers had settled in the vicinity of present-day Moscow and Barton.

         It is not known precisely where the Myer home was located, but Peter at one time owned Military Lots 3845, 3846, 3925, 3927, and some other acreage. Peter Myer drew up his will 6/14/1803. In it he named 11 children, including daughter Anna who was named last. Since daughter Anna was only 1 year old at that time, it is likely that she was the youngest child. Evidently, Peter died soon after his will was signed, for the will was acted upon 10/5/1803. His place of burial is unknown.

        After Peter died, his widow Anna married James Albery. She died 10/31/1824 in Licking County, Ohio, and is buried in a marked grave at the Dawes Arboretum south of Newark, Ohio. James moved west after wife Anna's death, and no subsequent information is known about him.

        On 5/10/1817, Godfrey initiated a process to secure a clear title to his father's two military lots 3858 and 3859. On that date, a deed described the sale to Godfrey by his brother Jacob of the share of the lots which Jacob inherited. Godfrey paid $100 for Jacob's share. On 2/7/1828, MarcusGeorge, and Conrad and "Sally" sold their interest in their father's two Military Lots to Godfrey. On 2/16/1833, Godfrey had another deed recorded which described the sale by his sisters Elizabeth (Fazenbaker) Warnick and Catharine (Fazenbaker) Warnick of their shares of the lots. No record has been found of any transaction involving the missing Fazenbaker sibling, John Fazenbaker, who had left the area by 1818. Nevertheless, it appears that Godfrey obtained a clear title to his father's land.

For reasons lost to history, Godfrey Fazenbaker received a payment from the estate of James Morrison, Jr., on 11/11/1823.

In 1833 Godfrey was appointed Constable of District No. 4 of Allegany County. One must infer that Godfrey was a respected member of his community.

At the time of the 1840 census, Godfrey headed a household of 12 people. While that census did not record the names of the people in the household other than the head, it did record their age brackets. In Godfrey's household were: 1 male age 50 and under 60 (identity unknown); 1 male age 40 and under 50 (presumably Godfrey himself, born 3/2/1795); 1 male age 10 but under 15 (probably son Jackson Myer, born about 1828); 1 male age 5 and under 10 (probably son James Totten Fazenbaker, born about 1834); 1 male under 5 (probably son Edward Lewis Fazenbaker, born about 1836); 1 female age 30 and under 40 (probably Godfrey's wife Annie, born 4/30/1802), 3 females age 15 and under 20 (probably daughters Julia Ann, born about 1821; Emily Amanda, born about 1822; and Golda Ellen, born about 1824); 2 females age 10 but under 15 (probably daughters Mary Jane, born 1826; and Evaline, born about 1830); and 1 female age 5 and under 10 (probably daughter Louisa, born about 1832). This list accounts for all of Godfrey's known children up to this point in time. The census reported that one person in the household was engaged in agriculture.

        Godfrey served on the Levy Court and served as an Allegany County Commissioner in 1840, 1841, and for the term 1843-1845. The source of information for this item, J. Thomas Scharf, did not record whether these positions were elected or appointed, but it is fair to conclude that Godfrey was one of the most honored citizens of the region.

        At the time of the 1850 census, Godfrey headed a household of nine people. The 1850 census was the first federal census to list the names of each member of the household. Besides Godfrey and Anna, the household in that year included daughters Mary Jane (age 22), "Evaline" (age 20), and Louisa (age 18), two children whose names are illegible (ages 17 and 15, probably sons James Totten and Edward Lewis), son William (age 7), and Aaron Duckworth (age 29).

        Godfrey lived on his father's farm until about 1853, when he moved with his family to a farm in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, which included the site of Fort Necessity at the Great Meadows, originally patented to General George Washington. On 10/31/1855, Godfrey signed an agreement to purchase this tract of land, then known as the Mount Washington tract, from the heirs of James Sampey for the sum of $4,000.

         Fort Necessity was the site of a preliminary battle of the French and Indian War in 1754. At that time, the area was devoid of permanent settlers.

        Today, the U.S. National Park Service has reconstructed Fort Necessity on its original site, and it is a tourist attraction. The fort itself is a small enclosure consisting mainly of a solid fence of tall wood poles. Visitors park at a modern visitors center staffed by federal park rangers and walk a short distance to the reconstructed fort.

 

        When Godfrey Fazenbaker purchased the site in 1855 or 1856 from the heirs of James and Rebecca Sampey, the Mount Washington Tavern there was already a well-known landmark. According to Fazenbaker family historian Louis Hicks, "The Godfrey Fazenbaker family farmed the land and lived in the tavern originally built in the 1820's when the Cumberland (National) Road was one of the main routes for settlers moving west and for commerce going both east and west." In 1806, the National Road had become the nation's first federally funded project for internal improvements. It was championed by Albert Gallatin, who was President Jefferson's Secretary of the Treasury and a huge land owner in Fayette County, in southwest Pennsylvania. The railroads first crossed the mountains about 1852, and they offered a much faster, more comfortable and cheaper means of transportation than anything that was available on the National Road. Thus, this caused a dramatic reduction in commerce and emigration on the Cumberland Road about the time that Godfrey purchased the property.

        Godfrey's home had only a few years previously been a prosperous tavern, known as the Mount Washington Tavern. Because of its proximity to Fort Necessity, the National Park Service acquired the property in the 1930s and in recent years it has restored the tavern to a romanticized vision of the period before the railroads. Today, Mount Washington Tavern is open to the public for guided tours.

        As early as 1858, pleas were being made to commemorate the site of Fort Necessity. "The site of the renowned fort is well known. Its ruins are yet [1858] visible. It stands on the Great Meadow run, which empties into the Youghiogheny. The Great Meadows,' with which its name associates in history, was a large natural meadow or glade, now highly cultivated and improved. The place is now better known by the name Mount Washington,' on the National Road, ten miles east of Uniontown." "James Sampey heirs have recently sold it to a Mr. Fazenbaker. An ineffectual effort was made some years ago to erect a monument upon the site. The first battle ground of Washington surely deserves a worthier mark of commemoration than mouldering embankments, surmounted by a few decaying bushes." Contemporaneous accounts quote Godfrey Fazenbaker and his descendants attesting that the site of the Fort itself was never disturbed by a plow while they owned it.

         According to the brochure now put out by the Park Service, the tavern was considered an "imposing brick and stone building" built about 1828. The brochure shows the floor plan for the building and describes the tavern operation in its heyday. The brochure mentions the ownership for 75 years by Godfrey Fazenbaker and his family. Godfrey made use of the building as his home, and by the standards of that time, it was a mansion. It has 9 working fireplaces, seven bedrooms on the second floor, large attic, and basement once used as the kitchen.

        Godfrey's will was dated 4/3/1871. In it he named his children: Julia Ann "Hammell," wife of Henry "Hammell" of "Kitzmillerville," MD; Emily Amanda Jacobs wife of Asa Jacobs of Petersburg, Somerset County, PA; "Goldie" Ellen Sigler, wife of John J. Sigler of Wellman, Washington County, Iowa; Mary Jane Lashbaugh, of Barton, Allegany County, MD; Jackson Myer Fazenbaker; "Evaline" Fazenbaker; Louisa Shaw, wife of Thompson Shaw of Tainter, Mahaska County, Iowa; and Edward Lewis Fazenbaker who was named Executor. Sons James Totten Fazenbaker and William Henry Fazenbaker had already passed away by the time the will was written.

        Godfrey died 4/7/1884. Annie died 10/7/1884.

        Children of Godfrey and Annie: Julia Ann Fazenbaker (born 8/21/1821); Emily Amanda Fazenbaker (born 11/18/1822); Golda Ellen Fazenbaker (born in August 1824); Mary Jane Fazenbaker (born 4/8/1826); Jackson Myer Fazenbaker (born 2/10/1828); Evalina (or Evaline) Fazenbaker (born 4/1/1830); Louisa Fazenbaker (born 1/9/1832); James Totten Fazenbaker (born 1/16/1834); Edward Lewis "Lewis" Fazenbaker (born 8/9/1836); and William Henry Fazenbaker (born 4/15/1843).

Catharine Fazenbaker, wife of William Warnick

 

Catharine Fazenbaker was presumably born about the late 1790s, daughter of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker.

       Catharine may have been known as "Katie" because that is how her name was recorded in a public record made long after her death. At the time of the 1810 census, she was apparently living in the household headed by her widowed mother Elizabeth. Catharine married William Warnick; their license was dated 2/3/1817. William was born 2/22/1798. William was a brother of Joseph Warnick who married Elizabeth Fazenbaker.

        On 2/16/1833, Catharine's brother Godfrey Fazenbaker had a deed recorded which described Catharine's sale of the share of Military Lots 3858 and 3859 which she inherited from her father. The deed is unclear whether Catharine received $100 from Godfrey, or whether she split that amount with her sister Elizabeth.

        Catharine's father George Fazenbaker was a settler on Military Lot 3869 when Francis Deakins conducted his survey in 1787. The Fazenbaker farm was about two miles north of land owned by Joseph Warnick, father of William. By 1798, George came to own two other Military Lots, 3858 and 3859, which were less than 1/2 mile northeast of some of Joseph Warnick's property. In those days before the automobile, paved roads, or trains, the usual circumstance was for spouses to come from the same neighborhood.

        In 1844, a deposition concerning the estate of William's father, the pioneer Joseph Warnick, stated that William possessed the "Onion Patch," part of Joseph's estate. The "Onion Patch" contained about 150 acres three miles from Lonaconing. It had formerly been the home of William's sister Jane Robinson. Subsequently, the "Onion Patch" would come to be owned by his brother John Warnick.

        In 1860, five of William and Catharine Warnick's grandchildren were living with them: "Susan" and Jane Warnick, children of Joseph; and John, Jefferson, and Holland, children of Elizabeth who also resided in the household. The surname of Elizabeth and her children was given as Warnick, but it was listed as Keyes in later census records, and it appears that the census taker recorded incorrect data.

        At the time of the 1870 census, William and Catharine were the only two members of their household. This is the last record of Catharine.

        In 1880, 83-year-old William was living with his daughter Elizabeth Keyes in Barton. Catharine was not listed and may have died by that time. It was recorded that William's father was born in Ireland. This is the earliest assertion found by this writer that the pioneer Joseph Warnick came from Ireland.

         Scharf's History of Western Maryland reported in 1882 that William was the oldest resident of Barton. He would have been about 85 at that time. Ceph Moore wrote in the 1880s that William Warnick died on Friday 1/1/1886, age 87 years, 10 months and 9 days. Ceph recalled that William was an old acquaintance of his father, Levi Moore (11/15/1807-2/28/1883), and mother, Nancy Broadwater (11/10/1813-1/19/1892). An old Bible record in the family of William's sister Elizabeth (Warnick) Ross noted that William died 1/15/1886, thus differing by two weeks from the date given by Ceph Moore.

        Children of William and Catharine: Joseph W. "Elbow Joe" Warnick (born in February 1827), James Warnick (born about 1828 or 1829), Elizabeth Warnick (born 12/18/1832), Mary Jane Warnick (born about 1834), and William Warnick (born 11/21/1837).

George Fazenbaker, son of the pioneer George Fazenbaker, and Sarah "Sally" (Walls)

 

        George Fazenbaker was born in Maryland about 1800, son of George Fazenbaker and Elizabeth. George married Sarah "Sally" Walls, daughter of William Walls and Elizabeth "Betsey" Broadwater. Sally was born 9/5/1803. George and Sally's eldest-known child, Jane, was born in 1822 in what is now Garrett County.

        George inherited a share of his father's estate. On 2/7/1828, George together with his brothers Conrad and Marcus and sister "Sally" sold their interest in their father's two Military Lots to brother Godfrey Fazenbaker.

        At the time of the 1840 census, George headed a household of 10 people. While that census did not record the names of the people in the household other than the head, it did record their age brackets. Unlike so many other households in the area, no one was involved in agriculture. Rather, one person, presumably George, was involved in manufacture and trade.

        While little is known about the family life of this generation of Fazenbakers, we do have the bit of information recorded that George and Sally objected to the marriage about 1842 of daughter Jennie to John Bear, this according to Jennie's own account. While practically every article of life has radically changed since then, parents' concern for the well-being of their children has not.

        In 1850, George's household was in the New Germany area of western Allegany County (now Garrett County). That year, he was working as a laborer and headed a household of 12 people. The 1850 census was the first federal census to list the name of each member of the household. His mother-in-law Betsey "Wall", age 73, was living with the family in that year, as were children "Mark" (age 24), Henry (age 19), Martha (age 17), Ormand (age 15), Godfrey (age 12), Joshua (no age given), Constantine (age 9), Ann R. (age 6), and Mary (age 5). At one time, George and his wife lived near the National Road (now Alternate U.S. Route 40).

At the time of the 1870 census, Sally was living in the household headed by son Joshua in the vicinity of Frostburg. Daughter Mary L. was also in the household. George was not listed in the household; perhaps he had died by that time. The 1880 census noted that Sally was a widow. Joshua was living in the household. An 1891 account written by Sally's cousin Amos Broadwater reported that Sally was then living with the Layman family--surname of daughter 7.12 Mary--near Frostburg. Sally died 3/22/1898, age 94.

        Children of George Fazenbaker and Sally Walls: Jane "Jennie" Fazenbaker (born 7/21/1822), Marks (or Marcus) "Indian Marks" Fazenbaker (born 10/25/1827), William Fazenbaker (born about 1828), Henry Fazenbaker (born in October 1831), Martha Fazenbaker (born in the mid-1830s), Orman Fazenbaker (born 9/27/1834), Godfrey Fazenbaker (born about 1838), Joshua Fazenbaker (born 9/28/1840), Constantine "Tine" Fazenbaker (born 9/28/1840), Anna R. Fazenbaker (born 1/19/1844), and Mary L. Fazenbaker (born 12/16/1845).

Conrad Fazenbaker and wives Dorcas (Dennit) and Delila (Jenkins)

 

        Conrad Fazenbaker was born 9/9/1802, son of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. Locally, his given name is pronounced like Coonrod, and indeed an old family Bible records his name with this phonetic spelling. On 12/3/1826 in Allegany County, he married 1) Dorcas Dennit who was born 2/22/1806.

Conrad and Dorcas must have admired President George Washington, for in 1827 they named their first child George Washington Fazenbaker. They may have also admired well-known local minister John Miller, for their second child was named John Miller Fazenbaker.

       Conrad inherited a share of his father's estate. On 2/7/1828, Conrad together with his brothers George and Marcus and sister "Sally" sold their interest in their father's two Military Lots to Godfrey Fazenbaker.

          Conrad was the head of a household in Allegany County at the time of the 1830 census. Dorcas and Conrad were the parents of the first eight children listed below.

         Dorcas died in 1842 about the same time that a newborn daughter also named Dorcas died. According to a Bible record, the infant Dorcas was born 4/4/1842. The Bible shows that one Dorcas died that same day and the other died 7/18/1842, but available information does not allow a confident determination of which date applied to the mother and which applied to the daughter. That the two dates are so close suggests that the mother Dorcas may have had complications in childbirth.

        On 7/20/1844 (or on 8/15/1844 according to a Bible record), Conrad married 2) Delila Jenkins who was born 10/1/1815. She and Conrad were the parents of the last five children listed below. At the time of the 1860 census, Conrad, Delila and their five children formed a household in that part of Allegany County that would ultimately become Garrett County. Conrad was a farmer. Besides Conrad and wife Delila, the household included Eve C. (age 14), Rebecca (age 12), Thomas (age 11), Isabella (age 8), and Clemen Cass (age 5).

        At the time of the 1870 census, Conrad was head of a household of six people. Besides Conrad and wife "Delia," the household included Rebecca, Frank T. (age 21), Isabella (age 18), and Clemance C. (age 15).

       At the time of the 1880 census, Conrad was head of a household in Garrett County that included wife Delila, "Clemmon," and four grandchildren.

Delila died 12/19/1889. Conrad died 3/30/1891.

        Children of Conrad Fazenbaker and Dorcas: George Washington Fazenbaker (born 9/2/1827), John Miller Fazenbaker (born 4/24/1829), Secelia Fazenbaker (born 10/26/1831), Harriett Fazenbaker (born 4/23/1834), Sarah Ellen Fazenbaker (born 4/22/1836), Hiley Fazenbaker (born 2/18/1838), Mary Ann Elizabeth Fazenbaker (born 4/23/1840), and Dorcas Fazenbaker (born 4/4/1842). Children of Conrad and Delila: Eva Catherine "Catherine" Fazenbaker (born 7/1/1845), Rebecca Susan Fazenbaker (born 4/8/1847), Francis Thomas "Frank" or "Thomas" Fazenbaker (born 4/2/1849), Isabella (or Isabel) Fazenbaker (born 2/29/1852), and Clemen Carl Augustus "Gus" Fazenbaker (born 4/29/1855).

Marcus Fazenbaker and Jane "Jennie" (Broadwater)

 

        Marcus Fazenbaker was born 12/25/1805, son of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. He married Jane "Jennie" Broadwater who was born about 1809. According to genealogist Wayne Bittinger, it is likely, though not certain, that Jane was a daughter of Guy Broadwater.

        Marcus was a farmer. He inherited a share of his father's estate. On 2/7/1828, Marcus together with his brothers George and Conrad and sister "Sally" sold their interest in their father's two Military Lots to Godfrey Fazenbaker.

        At the time of the 1830 census, Marcus headed a household of four people. At the time of the 1840 census, Marcus headed a household of eight people. The numbers and age brackets match all of Marcus' known children as of 1840. The census reported that one person in the household was involved in agriculture.

        At the time of the 1850 census, Marcus headed a family of 10 people. The 1850 census was the first federal census to list the names of each member of the household. Besides Marcus and Jane, the household that year included sons Jesse (age 18), Jefferson (age 16), Ephriam (age 14), Otho (age 11), Marcus (age 9), and Patrick (age 7), daughter Charlotte (age 5) and son Oliver (age 2).

At the time of the 1860 census, Marcus was head of a household in Allegany County which included Jane and six children: sons Jefferson (age 26), Otha (age 22), and Marcus (age 20), daughter Charlotte (age 15), son Oliver (age 13), and daughter Rebecca (age 9).

        At the time of the 1870 census, Marcus was head of a household of five people. Besides Marcus and wife Jane, the household included son Oliver, age 22. In addition, the household included Marcus's widowed daughter Rebecca Johnson, age 18, and her daughter Jenny, age 1. Marcus' occupation was listed as farmer.

        At the time of the 1880 census, Marcus was head of a household in Garrett County which included wife Jane, son Oliver, daughter Rebecca "Becka" Frumhart, and Becka's children James Frumhart (age 3), and Jennie Johnson (age 11). Marcus farmed at Firm Rock in Garrett County.

         On 1/22/1886, Marcus signed his will. He left his farm and personal property to his wife Jane for the rest of her life. Then son Oliver was to have the farm after he paid the following sums to Marcus' other children: $146 to son Marcus M. Facenbaker; $200 to daughter Rebecca Fromhart; $200 to daughter Nancy Michael, $100 to son "Ephriam"; $1 to son "Oath"; $1 to son Jesse; $1 to daughter "Sharlotte" Patrick; $1 to son Jefferson; and $1 to daughter "Senith" Wilson.

        He died 4/11/1886 at the age of eighty-one years, 3 months, and 20 days, according to his marker at the family cemetery on his property. Jane died 2/27/1895.

        Fazenbaker family historian Louis Hicks in his "27th Article" about the Fazenbaker family reported on the ownership of Marcus' farm at Firm Rock in eastern Garrett County up through 1977, "Marcus left it to son Oliver. Oliver to his son Ernest. And Ernest's son Junior now has it."

         Children of Marcus and Jane: Ascenith E. Fazenbaker (born about 1828); Nancy Fazenbaker (born 10/30/1827); Jesse (or Jessie) Franklin Fazenbaker (born 11/27/1832); Jefferson S. Facenbaker (born 4/22/1834); Ephriam Fazenbaker (born in 1836); Otho Harmon "Othey" or "Otha" Fazenbaker (born 4/18/1838); Marcus Manuel (or Manual) "Squire Marks" Fazenbaker (born 9/15/1840); Patrick Stephen Fazenbaker (born 12/8/1843); Charlotte Ann "Sis" Fazenbaker (born 3/10/1845); Oliver Fazenbaker (born 5/17/1846); and Rebecca Jane "Becka" Fazenbaker (born 2/8/1852).

Charles Broadwater and Mary Magdalene (Beavers) Broadwater

 

        Charles "Charley" Broadwater was born 4/22/1778, son of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary (Piper) Broadwater. In Virginia in 1802, he married Mary Magdalene Beavers who was born in 1782, daughter of Jacob Beavers. Mary's mother's name is not known, but a grandson reported that Mary's mother married twice. Her first husband was Henry Wilt, and by him she had son Peter Wilt, the ancestor of many of the numerous Wilt family of western Maryland, and Michael Wilt. Michael came to western Maryland before 1800, and his Broadwater kin followed during the coming years.

         Charles and Mary had their first child Amos in Loudoun County, Virginia in 1804. In 1807, Charles and his young family left Loudoun County and settled in what is now Garrett County, MD. His son Amos said many years later, "This county was mostly all in woods when I first came here..." Conrad Fazenbaker who lived on Big Savage Moutain recalled, "When Charles Broadwater Came from the State of Virginia to the State [of] Maryland ... he came to my Fathers house to purchase a cow."

        The Charles Broadwater family lived a number of places in what is now Garrett County. They first settled for a year on a property later owned by Marcus M. Fazenbaker, in the Firm Rock section, between Pine Swamp and Westernport. They then moved to a hill farm on Laurel Run, north of Barton, where they lived for three years, and afterwards settled in the Savage River area.

         Charles was drafted into the American army on or about 8/15/1814. He served as a private in Capt. Thomas Blair's infantry company of the First Regiment of Maryland Militia, from 9/2/1814 through 10/30/1814. The company marched to Baltimore and was stationed at Camp Deal, near Baltimore. Charles was honorably discharged at Camp Deal and returned home on foot. His rate of pay had been $8 per month.

        On 6/5/1830, Charles bought 30 acres of the tract "Brants Farm" on the west side of Savage River in what is now Garrett County. On 11/27/1848, he bought another piece of land on Savage--102 1/2 acres of the tract "Father Sons and Brothers." This second property, located between Broadwater Chapel and Merrill, was purchased from his brother William Broadwater. A later deed referred to this part of "Father Son and Brothers" as the place where Charles "resided on for many years and at the time of his death." Jacob Brown said of him, "He was not large in stature, but remarkably hardy, tough and industrious--a farmer of course--of hills at a slant of about 45 degrees."

        Charles made his last will and testament on 6/17/1858. He bequeathed to his granddaughter Mary Engle one cow and one bed. All of the rest of his property was bequeathed to his "beloved wife Mary Magdalene Broadwater." He died at his home on Savage River at noon on Friday, 8/5/1859. He was buried in a small graveyard on his farm.

        After Charles' death, his widow received a government pension because of her husband's service during the War of 1812. Mary died 12/19/1877. Jacob Brown reported that she had died "at great age, much respected."

        Children of Charles Broadwater and Mary Magdalene Beavers: Amos Broadwater (born 8/9/1804), Jefferson Broadwater (born 8/1/1806), Catharine Broadwater (born 3/14/1808), Mary M. "Polly" Broadwater (born 1/3/1810), William C. "King Billy" Broadwater (born 10/4/1811), Charles C. "Charley C." Broadwater (born in 1815), Samuel Broadwater (born in October 1817), Peter Broadwater (born in March 1820), Rebecca Broadwater (born 5/8/1822), Mahala Broadwater (3/10/1824 or 1825), Ephraim Broadwater (born 2/20/1828), Ashford Broadwater (7/15/1831).

Sarah "Sally" Broadwater, wife of a Holden, (or Halden, or Hallden, or Holdren)

 

        Sarah "Sally" Broadwater, daughter of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary (Piper) Broadwater, married a Holden (or Halden, or Hallden, or Holdren). Amos Broadwater, Sr., reported in 1891 that his Aunt Sally and husband had "moved from Loudoun County, Va., to Bedford County, Va., and have not been heard from for many years. They had a large family of sons and daughters," but their number and names are not now known. A few years previous, Cephas Moore wrote that Sally's brother Charles Broadwater "went to See Her once. She lived in Bedford, Va. He went S of Lexington East Va. They afterward went to Alabama." Cephas added, "Her Son Morrel Halden came back to Md. Once to see His relatives."

Elizabeth "Betsey" Broadwater, wife of William Walls

 

        Elizabeth "Betsey" Broadwater was born about 1777, daughter of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary (Piper) Broadwater. Betsey married William Walls.

William Walls came to Allegany County, MD, from Lancaster County, PA. Amos Broadwater, Sr., reported that William and Betsey lived on the National Road (now Alternate U. S. Route 40) "near Thomas Johnson's." (Johnson operated an inn along the National Road three miles west of Frostburg.) Amos said that William "was a stone mason by trade, which he followed in the summer and taught school in the winter."

        William and Betsey had one daughter "Sallie" who married George Fazenbaker. At the time of the 1830 census, William's household contained only himself and his wife.

        William may have been deceased by the time of the 1850 census. This census shows that Betsey was living in her daughter Sally's home in the Grantsville District of what is now Garrett County, MD. Betsey died 7/12/1869.

Charles Broadwater and Mary Magdalene (Beavers) Broadwater

 

Charles "Charley" Broadwater was born 4/22/1778, son of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary (Piper) Broadwater. In Virginia in 1802, he married Mary Magdalene Beavers who was born in 1782, daughter of Jacob Beavers. Mary's mother's name is not known, but a grandson reported that Mary's mother married twice. Her first husband was Henry Wilt, and by him she had son Peter Wilt, the ancestor of many of the numerous Wilt family of western Maryland, and Michael Wilt. Michael came to western Maryland before 1800, and his Broadwater kin followed during the coming years.

Charles and Mary had their first child Amos in Loudoun County, Virginia in 1804. In 1807, Charles and his young family left Loudoun County and settled in what is now Garrett County, MD. His son Amos said many years later, "This county was mostly all in woods when I first came here..." Conrad Fazenbaker who lived on Big Savage Moutain recalled, "When Charles Broadwater Came from the State of Virginia to the State [of] Maryland ... he came to my Fathers house to purchase a cow."

The Charles Broadwater family lived a number of places in what is now Garrett County. They first settled for a year on a property later owned by Marcus M. Fazenbaker, in the Firm Rock section, between Pine Swamp and Westernport. They then moved to a hill farm on Laurel Run, north of Barton, where they lived for three years, and afterwards settled in the Savage River area.

Charles was drafted into the American army on or about 8/15/1814. He served as a private in Capt. Thomas Blair's infantry company of the First Regiment of Maryland Militia, from 9/2/1814 through 10/30/1814. The company marched to Baltimore and was stationed at Camp Deal, near Baltimore. Charles was honorably discharged at Camp Deal and returned home on foot. His rate of pay had been $8 per month.

On 6/5/1830, Charles bought 30 acres of the tract "Brants Farm" on the west side of Savage River in what is now Garrett County. On 11/27/1848, he bought another piece of land on Savage--102 1/2 acres of the tract "Father Sons and Brothers." This second property, located between Broadwater Chapel and Merrill, was purchased from his brother William Broadwater. A later deed referred to this part of "Father Son and Brothers" as the place where Charles "resided on for many years and at the time of his death."

Jacob Brown said of him, "He was not large in stature, but remarkably hardy, tough and industrious--a farmer of course--of hills at a slant of about 45 degrees."

Charles made his last will and testament on 6/17/1858. He bequeathed to his granddaughter Mary Engle one cow and one bed. All of the rest of his property was bequeathed to his "beloved wife Mary Magdalene Broadwater." He died at his home on Savage River at noon on Friday, 8/5/1859. He was buried in a small graveyard on his farm.

After Charles' death, his widow received a government pension because of her husband's service during the War of 1812. Mary died 12/19/1877. Jacob Brown reported that she had died "at great age, much respected."

Children of Charles Broadwater and Mary Magdalene Beavers: Amos Broadwater (born 8/9/1804), Jefferson Broadwater (born 8/1/1806), Catharine Broadwater (born 3/14/1808), Mary M. "Polly" Broadwater (born 1/3/1810), William C. "King Billy" Broadwater (born 10/4/1811), Charles C. "Charley C." Broadwater (born in 1815), Samuel Broadwater (born in October 1817), Peter Broadwater (born in March 1820), Rebecca Broadwater (born 5/8/1822), Mahala Broadwater (3/10/1824 or 1825), Ephraim Broadwater (born 2/20/1828), Ashford Broadwater (7/15/1831).

Guy Broadwater

 

        Guy Broadwater, son of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary (Piper) Broadwater, married Mary "Polly" Piles on 12/30/1809, in Loudoun County, VA. They settled on land along Savage River about 1811.

        Guy was especially noted for his stentorian voice; it was said that he could "stand on a hill and call his hogs and cattle for miles around. The Broadwater families were fond of dancing in the early days; frequent dances were held in their homes. Guy would call "figures" so loudly tht the chimney would shake. One day a Methodist minister came into the neighborhood and converted all the families and the dances ceased."

        The 1820 census showed that the Guy Broadwater household included Guy, his wife, two boys and six girls. His wife Mary died about the 1820s. Children of Guy and Mary: Jennie, Sallie, Elizabeth, Mary, Patsey, John, Henry, and William. It is possible, but not certain, that this William might have been known as Noble W. Broadwater, the progenitor of large Garrett County family. In 1830, Guy's household contained only himself and four children.

        During the 1830s, Guy took up housekeeping with Susanna (Reckner) McIntire, daughter of Revolutionary War soldier Daniel Reckner and widow of James McIntire. They had one daughter, Charity who became the third wife of John Barnes, Sr. John Barnes' second wife had been Sarah "Sally" (Fazenbaker) Clouse, and his first had been Nancy Broadwater.

        Guy Broadwater died 7/26/1864. Cephas Moore reported that he was buried in a corner of a field on the Marcus Fazenbaker property.

William Broadwater and Rebecca (Green)

 

       William Broadwater, son of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary (Piper) Broadwater, arrived in western Maryland about 1805 or 1807. He married Rebecca Green who was born 7/31/1792, daughter of the western Maryland family headed by Robert Green and first wife, Barbary.

        William and Rebecca's first child was born in 1813. The family lived for a time on Laurel Run, on the east side of Big Savage Mountain.

        William served in the American army for serveral months during the War of 1812. He was a private in Capt. Mclaughlin's infantry company from 8/11/1814 to 10/13/1814 and in Capt. Lowrye's infrantry company from 10/14/1814 to 1/10/1815. Both companies were part of the First Regiment of Maryland Militia. His rate of pay was $8 per month. He returned home on foot from Baltimore.

About 1821, his nephew Amos Broadwater moved his household from "the Laurel Run Bottom House" to a property on Savage River, near the mouth of Poplar Lick Run. It was probably here that William had the first sawmill on Savage River. This mill was built for him by "William and Jesse Tumbleson" (probably Tomlinson).

        William Broadwater received warrants for three adjacent properties on Savage River: "Panama Mission" (17 3/4 acres) in 1825; "Father Son and Brothers"--which he obtained in partnership with his father-in-law Robert Green--(310 7/8 acres) in 1826; and "Turkey Lodge" (177 1/8 acres) in 1826. In 1834, William bought out his father-in-law's interest in the tract called "Father Son and Brothers."

        Rebecca died 10/18/1854. William died during the 1860s. Grandson Cephas Moore wrote of him, "He thought that he would be 84 years old if He lived to See March." William was buried in the small cemetery on his "Homeplace on Savage," later known as the Gregg Cemetery.

       Children of William and Rebecca: Nancy Ann Broadwater (born 11/10/1813), Henry Broadwater (born 1/13/1817), Robert Broadwater (born April 1819), Jefferson W. "Jeff" Broadwater (born in April 1822), William W. "Hill Bill" Broadwater (born 6/1/1824), Barbara Ellen "Ellen" Broadwater (born 4/2/1826), Hester Broadwater (born 5/8/1828), Salem Broadwater (born 10/1/1830), and Roseanna Broadwater (born in 1833).

Nancy Broadwater, wife of John Barnes

 

        Nancy Broadwater, daughter of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary (Piper) Broadwater, married John Barnes on 1/9/1813. In 1891, Amos Broadwater, Sr., wrote that John and Nancy lived "on the property now owned by John Barnes, Jr., near Barton." John and Nancy had one daughter Sarah Barnes born about 1814 and another child that died in infancy. Nancy died, for in June 1817, John married the widow Sarah "Sally" (Fazenbaker) Clouse. After Sally died, John married Charity Broadwater, daughter of Guy Broadwater.

Virginia "Jenny" Broadwater

Virginia "Jennie" Broadwater, daughter of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary (Piper) Broadwater, died at age 12.

 

Samuel "Sam" Broadwater and Nancy Ann (Layton)

 

Samuel "Sam" Broadwater, son of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary (Piper) Broadwater, came to western Maryland from Loudoun County, VA, with his mother about 1809. They settled on Big Savage Mountain on a tract of land called "Beatty's Plains" in what is now Garrett County. After his mother died, Sam continued to live in this area. At the time of the 1840 census, he was living alone.

        Sam married Nancy Ann Layton who was much younger than Sam, having been born about 1825, daughter of James Layton and Elizabeth Chambers.

Sam died 3/26/1864. He was buried in the Corbus Cemetery not far from his home. In 1870, Nancy headed a household that contained four of her children. In 1880, she and her father were members of son Kennard's household in eastern Garrett County. In 1910, Nancy was living at her daughter Elizabeth's home in the Gilmore District of Allegany County. Nancy died on Dans Mountain near Moscow Mills, Allegany County, on 1/29/1911.

        The census taker recorded late in Nancy's life that she had had nine children. Several died young. The names of four are known: Amos Broadwater (born about 1842), Elizabeth Broadwater (born about 1848), Sarah Ellen "Ellen" Broadwater (born about 1851) and Samuel C. "Sam" Broadwater (born 11/16/1858).

Casper Durst

 

        In 1922, George M. Durst reported that Casper Durst's father "emigrated from Switzerland and settled in Southern Pa., just about 200 years ago." George (born in 1846) said that Casper was born in Pennsylvania in the year of George Washington's birth, 1732. Casper was named in the 1765 assessment for Heidelberg Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania.

         Casper's first wife was Anna Elizabeth ---. In 1767, their infant son John was baptized at St. John's (Hain's) Reformed Church in Lower Heidelberg Township, Berks County. The baptismal record spelled the family name Dorst.

Children of Casper Durst and first wife, Anna Elizabeth:

(1) John "Lightfoot John" Durst (1767-1839 or 1840). Moved to Garrett Co. late in life. Married 1) Eva Margaret Glotfelty (born 4/12/1769), daughter of Solomon Glotfelty and Maria Eva Friend. Married 2) Margaret Robison, a widow.

(2) Henry Durst (born about 1769). Married Barbara Garlitz (born about 1762).

(3) Jacob Durst (born in 1774). Married Mary "Polly" Knoyer (born about 1789).

(4) Susanna Durst (born about 1776).

(5) Elizabeth "Betsy" Durst (May 1780-1863). Married Christian "Christly" Garlitz (born about 1777; died in 1845). Southeast of Grantsville.

(6) and (7) children? (born prior to 1785).

        Casper "Dorst" was assessed in the 1768 "proprietary Return" for Heidelberg Township; he was taxed for two horses and two head of cattle. During the late 1760s or early 1770s, he moved to the section of western Bedford County, Pennsylvania, which later became Somerset County. The name Casper "Durst" was included in the second assessment for the area that is now Somerset County; this assessment was for the 1774 taxes.

          Jacob Brown wrote the following about Casper Durst in the late 1800s: "Little is known of old Caspar. Tradition says he was a man of remarkable agility. It is said of him that he could spring a wolf trap with his feet and jump out without being caught. This is a pretty tough story and is not vouched for...."

It is possible that Casper was soldier in the Continental army for a time during the Revolutionary War. He may have joined a unit across the state line in Washington County, Maryland. (When this county was formed in 1776, it included all of the territory that is presently Washington, Allegany, and Garrett counties.) The name "Gaspert Dust" appeared on the roll of Capt. Daniel Cresap's colonial company from Washington County.

        Casper was taxed in Bedford County--in the part that is now Somerset County--during the following years: 1776; 1779 (assessed for 200 acres); 1783 (200 acres, two horses, four head of cattle, seven sheep); and 1784.

        Although he was assessed in Brothersvalley Township in the available tax lists from 1774 through 1784, Casper was presumably living in the section that would soon become Elk Lick Township. Historian Eber Cockley commented, "Elk Lick township was erected in 1785 from part of Brothers Valley. Clement Engle, Casper Durst and Solomon Glotfelty families were neighbors in the Elk Lick settlement. These early families rode horseback 20 miles over narrow pack horse trails in dense forest to the nearest churchhouse, a log schoolhouse located in Berlin. Erected in 1777 on the western frontier of that day, provided for the instruction of children and was also used for occasional religious services.... In 1789 Lutheran and Reformed families formed congregations in Elk Lick and erected a church for joint use by the two congregations."

        Two of Casper's children and several of his grandchildren were baptized at the Lutheran and Reformed Union church in Elk Lick Township.

Casper and his sons John and Henry were named in "A list of inhabitants of Elk Lick Township" who were required to perform militia duty. This list was dated February 7, 1789.

        As noted above, George M. Durst recalled the tradition that Casper Durst was born the same year as George Washington. George reported, "Old Casper would say in his broken English (at least it was told of him), 'I'm Fedtheral [Federalist], I voted for Voshington.'"

        Jacob Brown said that Casper was one of the first settlers in what is now the Grantsville region of Garrett County, Maryland. It is possible that he moved across the Mason-Dixon line to the Grantsville area about 1790, for his name did not appear in the Pennsylvania schedules at the time of the 1790 census. (That year's schedules for what are now Garrett and Allegany counties were destroyed when the British burned public buildings in Washington, DC, during the War of 1812.) It was presumably during the 1790s that Casper, a widower, remarried; his second wife was the Widow Knoyer. This marriage would have taken place no earlier than about 1789.

        Children of Casper Durst and second wife, the Widow Knoyer:

(1) Michael Durst (born 11/7/1800). Married Mary Hensel.

(2) Lydia Durst (born 1/2/1804). Married Archibald Sterner.

When the 1793 assessment lists were drawn up for Bedford County, Casper still owned land in Elk Lick Township, but he was not living on this land and was termed a "nonresident property holder." The sum that he was taxed shows that he owned a parcel on the order of about 50 acres. On 3/11/1795, John Durst patented a tract in this township, adjacent to land that Casper owned.

Casper may have returned to Elk Lick Township by the time the 1796 assessment was drawn up. That year, he was taxed for 45 acres (including five acres cleared), two horses, two head of cattle, and one house in the township. The total assessment value was $159.

        In 1797 and 1798, the Elk Lick Township assessments listed Casper with 50 acres but no personal property. It is likely that he was a Maryland resident during this period, as the first assessment for western Allegany County (now Garrett County) included his name. This assessment, dated 1798, taxed him for a fair amount of possessions (primarily five horses and 14 "black cattle") but no real estate. In 1799 and 1800, he was taxed for 50 acres of "unseated" land in Elk Lick Township--land on which he was not then residing.

        Casper's name was removed from the Allegany County tax lists in 1800. He was in Elk Lick Township at the time of that year's federal census; he was taxed for 50 acres there from 1801 through 1808, and was taxed for one horse and two head of cattle from 1802 through 1806. Finally, in 1807 and 1808, he was taxed only for his acreage in the township.

        Casper may have died prior to the 1810 census, for he was not named as head of any household that year in census schedules for Pennsylvania or Maryland. In addition, no Durst household in Somerset or Allegany counties in 1810 (or that of his son-in-law Christian Garlitz) included a male of his age. Casper and both wives were reportedly buried in the old Reformed church cemetery on the east side of Salisbury, in Elk Lick Township.

Jacob Durst and Mary "Polly" (Knoyer) Durst

 

        Jacob Durst was born in 1774, son of Casper Durst and first wife, Anna Elizabeth ---. His name appeared in the 1796 assessment for Elk Lick Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania. In 1800, he was the sole member of a household in that township. From 1800 to 1806, he was assessed for real estate (about 60 acres on the average) as well as livestock (one or two horses and one head of cattle) in Elk Lick Township.

        Jacob married Mary "Polly" Knoyer (born about 1789), daughter of the Widow Knoyer; Mary's mother had married Jacob's father, apparently when Mary was a young girl. Jacob and Mary's eldest-known child was born in 1805.

Children of Jacob Durst and Mary "Polly" Knoyer:

(1) Joseph Durst (1805-1880). Married 1) Sarah --- (born about 1815). Addison, Pa. Married 2) ---. West Virginia.

(2) Jacob Durst (born 1/9/1809). First husband of Nancy Wiland, daughter of William Wiland and Margaret Durst.

(3) Elizabeth Durst (born in 1815). Married --- Lenhart.

(4) "Major" Philip Durst (1817-2/29/1888). Married Sarah Yeast (4/11/1810-6/7/1870), a widow.

(5) Michael Durst (4/19/1819-August 1892). Married Julia Ann Yeast (4/23/1823-1/27/1890), daughter of Jacob Yeast and Sarah Brown.

(6) Jeremiah Durst (1822-9/1/1883). Married Mary Knoyer (born in 1825 or 1826).

(7) Mary Ann Durst (1825-1904). Married 1) Martin West. Illinois. Married 2) Martin Crowe (died in 1915).

(8) Lydia Durst (born 5/13/1827). Married Samuel Custer, son of Emanuel Custer and Catharine Ringer.

(9) Solomon B. Durst (1830-1883). Married 1) Alice ---. Married 2) Sarah Pomaroy.

(10) Rachael Durst (born in 1833). Married Thomas Yeast (or Yaste). Preston, Minnesota.

        The Jacob Durst family came to western Allegany County (now Garrett County), Maryland, prior to the 1820 census. The 1820, 1830, and 1840 census schedules listed Jacob and his household in the Grantsville District of western Allegany County. It is said that he lived on Chestnut Ridge, southeast of Grantsville. Although that seems to have been his neighborhood in 1820 and 1840, it is possible that he was living on Maynardier Ridge in 1830.

        During the period 1813-1824, Jacob's name was added to Allegany County assessment books. At that time, he was taxed for two horses, two head of cattle, and $4 worth of other personal property. The 1825-1832 county assessment book listed him with the same amount of livestock, but with $15 worth of other possessions. He was taxed in the area that comprises modern-day north-central Garrett County.

         It is said of Jacob, "He was the strictest kind of a Puritan in his morals; he never used liquor or tobacco; he would not allow profane language used in his presence."

         Jacob died in 1844. His widow lived many years after his death. In 1870, she was a member of her son Philip's household in the Grantsville District.

Jacob Fazenbaker and Elizabeth "Betsy" (Reckner)

 

        Jacob Fazenbaker was born about the 1780s, son of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. On 1/17/1808, he married Elizabeth "Betsy" Reckner, daughter of Daniel and Sarah Reckner. Daniel was a veteran of the Revolutionary War. (His War records spelled the surname "Ricknor.") According to genealogist Wayne Bittinger, Daniel "enlisted in the Continental army at Allentown, Pennsylvania, in April 1778, for a term of three years. He was a private in Capt. William Oldham's Company of the 5th Pennsylvania Regiment and was present at the battles of Brandywine and Monmouth. He served in the army until the spring of 1781, and was discharged at Reading, Pennsylvania."

By 1787, Daniel Reckner had settled in western Maryland not far from the home of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. Daniel owned as much as 334 acres of land. His home place, which was probably where daughter Elizabeth was raised, was in the vicinity of Westernport Road north of the head of Aaron Run. In recent years a new military grave marker has been placed at his homeplace on Big Savage Mountain.

        Elizabeth's birth year is not reliably known. The 1870 census suggests about 1785, pension records relating to her husband's military service say about 1785 and also about 1789, and the 1850 census suggests about 1790. The pension records note that she and Jacob Fazenbaker were married in 1808 but also give the year as 1809. According to a contemporary, Charles Broadwater, they were married "in George's Hills in Allegany County...at the residence of the said Elizabeth's father."

         At the time of the 1810 census, Jacob Fazenbaker was head of a household that included four people. That census did not list the names of household members other than the head, but it did include the age brackets of each household member. An adult male and an adult female in the household were presumably Jacob and Elizabeth. There were also two males under age 10, but because the records of this family are so sparse, it requires an uncomfortable degree of speculation to ascribe names to these young boys.

        Jacob must have been respected by his neighbors, for he was a witness to the will of William Ross in 1807 and of William Howell on 10/15/1811. The Ross will was also witnessed by Jacob's father George Fazenbaker.

         Jacob served in the War of 1812 against Great Britain. Congress declared war on 6/18/1812, but for the next two years Great Britain was preoccupied with fighting Napoleon in Europe. When Napoleon was defeated early in 1814 and following U.S. attacks on Canada, Britain redeployed its forces and seriously threatened the United States for the first time. In all probability, it was this threat that caused Jacob Fazenbaker and many others to enroll in the army 8/11/1814 at Cumberland. Jacob was a substitute for one John Mathews. His pension record shows that he served as a corporal in Peter Connor's Company of Infantry, 1st Regiment Maryland Militia. Jacob's pay was $10 per month. Other soldiers also claimed to serve under Peter Connor, a local citizen. (The author's search of various data sources about veterans of the War of 1812 has failed to find Connor's service record. Recently, another family historian has suggested that the surname might have been recorded as "Colmer" rather than Connor, but this suggestion has not yet been pursued.)

         British forces were already en route to Washington, DC. They ascended the Patuxent River in southern Maryland and from there 4,000 troops traveled by land to the nation's capital. At that time, President Madison was in the field with the American army. Still at the White House, First Lady Dolly Madison got word of the imminent fall of Washington, so she secured some of the most important White House papers and fled. On 8/24/1814, the British sacked and burned the Capitol building and the White House. During this time, the seat of the U. S. government was temporarily relocated to the small Quaker town of Brookeville in Montgomery County, MD.

         Having achieved their mission in Washington, the British returned to their vessels, sailed back to the Chesapeake Bay and headed toward Baltimore. The British attack on Baltimore was repulsed 9/12/1814. Among the memorable historical facts about the attack on Baltimore is that Francis Scott Key composed The Star-Spangled Banner during the battle at Fort McHenry.

         The same British forces then sailed around Florida to the lower reaches of the Mississippi River where they undertook the capture of New Orleans. The British threat thus removed in the East, Jacob Fazenbaker was discharged from the army 10/10/1814 at Baltimore. He had served only 61 days, but this was enough to qualify his wife Elizabeth for various benefits years later.

         Britain and the U.S. signed a peace treaty at Ghent 12/24/1814, but communications were so poor in those days that the news did not reach all the combatants for some time. In particular, the British expedition in New Orleans precipitated a fierce battle on 1/8/1815. The British suffered huge losses. General Andrew Jackson led the U.S. troops, and his stunning victory over the British made him a national hero.

         This branch of the Fazenbaker clan had strong connections with the military. Jacob's father George Fazenbaker was a soldier in the Revolutionary War on behalf of the British. Jacob's father-in-law Daniel Reckner served on the American side in the Revolutionary War. Jacob saw duty in the War of 1812. And at least three of his sons (John Fazenbaker, Andrew Jackson Fazenbaker, and George Washington "Jona" Fazenbaker), two sons-in-law (William Layton, husband of daughter Elizabeth Fazenbaker; and Peter Layton, husband of daughter Mary Fazenbaker), and five grandsons served in the Union army during the Civil War.

        On 5/10/1817, Jacob sold to his brother Godfrey Fazenbaker the share of Military Lots 3858 and 3859 which Jacob inherited from his father. Godfrey paid $100.

       At the time of the 1820 census, Jacob was head of a household of eight people. That census did not record the names of the people in the household other than the head, and it has not been possible to plausibly reconstruct the family at this time. The only adult male, age 26 to 44, was presumably Jacob; the only adult female, age 26 to 44, was presumably Elizabeth. In addition there were one male age 10 to 15, one male age 0 to 9, and four females age 0 to 9.

During this period, Jacob received money from certain estates, but the circumstances are now lost to history. For example, Jacob received money on 8/13/1822 from the estate of William Sigler. He received funds on 6/10/1823 from the estate of William Barnes, smithy, who had made his will 5/8/1821.

In the 1820s, Jacob and Elizabeth were increasing their family and in 1828 Andrew Jackson was running for president of the United States. Jackson had a very different background from the previous six men who had held the office of president. Unlike his predecessors, Jackson had not been born to wealth and gentility, but rather was an entirely self-made man. He had a rough-and-tumble background, gaining a reputation not only from his daring exploits in the War of 1812, but also from the duels he had fought. The wave of populism that swept the country caused a great deal of concern among those interested in preserving the status quo. Elizabeth and Jacob, who, like Jackson, was a veteran of the War of 1812, left a permanent record of their feelings about Jackson by naming a new son Andrew Jackson Fazenbaker.

         Jacob and Elizabeth named their last son after President Washington. By the time Jacob and Elizabeth were middle age, they had named two sons after two of the seven people who had served as president up to that time. Evidently, Jacob and Elizabeth were proud patriots.

At the time of the 1830 census, Jacob was head of a household of 10 people. Like the 1820 census, the 1830 census did not record the names of the people in the household other than the head, and it has not been possible to reliably reconstruct the family at this time.

         When Elizabeth's father Daniel Reckner died about 1829, his sons George Reckner and John Reckner were named administrators of the estate; they paid certain amounts to Elizabeth wife of Jacob Fazenbaker. For example, the fifth account was paid on 1/9/1833.

         At the time of the 1840 census, Jacob headed a household of five people. While that census did not record the names of the people in the household other than the head, it did record their age brackets. In Jacob's household were: 1 male age 50 and under 60 (Jacob himself), 1 male age 10 and under 15; 1 male age 5 and under 10 (probably George W. "Jona," born in the early 1830s); 1 female age 50 and under 60 (probably Jacob's wife Elizabeth); and 1 female age 10 and under 15. Among Jacob's children, some, like son John had already formed households of their own. The census reported that one person in the household was involved in agriculture.

          At the time of the 1850 census Jacob was no longer head of household. His wife Elizabeth, youngest son George W. "Jona," and he were living with the family of William Broadwater and his wife Rebecca (Green) in their home along Savage River. There were also four of William and Rebecca s children living in the household who were young adults. William and Jacob had served at the same time and at the same places during the War of 1812, and may have previously been close neighbors. History records that William was a sawmill owner along Savage River, but he was also remembered as a farmer.

         Jacob died 3/22/1852. Beginning in 1855, Elizabeth applied for various federal benefits by virtue of Jacob's service in the War of 1812. Her pension applications confirmed much information of interest to family historians, such as Elizabeth's maiden name and marriage date. On 4/2/1855, Elizabeth filed a claim for bounty land which the Congress had recently made available. Among the files supporting her claim were affidavits submitted by 67-year-old William Broadwater, the sawmill owner and farmer with whom she and her husband were living in 1850, and James Smith affirming that Elizabeth was who she said she was.

        William said that he saw Jacob frequently, including when he served in the War of 1812. He contended that Jacob and Elizabeth had raised a large family of children in the neighborhood where William resided. Jacob had died a few miles from William's residence about three years previous, and Elizabeth still lived there. Charles Broadwater, age 71, filed an affidavit attesting that Jacob and Elizabeth had married at Elizabeth's father's home at "George's Hills." Both Charles and William made their marks on these documents. The pension file at the National Archives in Washington, DC, is not clear whether Elizabeth was awarded bounty land.

        At the time of the 1870 census, Elizabeth was living in the household headed by 22-year-old grandson Jacob Shriver, son of daughter Mary (Fazenbaker) Shriver Layton, near Westernport.

         In 1871, Congress passed a law that granted a pension to widows of veterans of the War of 1812, and Elizabeth first applied on 12/12/1871. To be eligible for a pension, the law specified that the applicant had to show that she was married to the veteran before 2/17/1815, that she remained in "widowhood," (i.e., she had not remarried), that the veteran had served a minimum of 60 days in the military, and that the claimant "remained loyal," presumably a reference to sympathies in the Civil War. Proving these claims required Elizabeth to gather a number of affidavits from various government officials over the next several months, such as by postmaster P. Goodwin of Barton, who served the area where Elizabeth lived. Uriah Duckworth, a Justice of the Peace, affirmed that he had seen the marriage records of Reverend William Shaw, which were then in the hands of A. B. Shaw, grandson of Reverend Shaw. The marriage date was 1/17/1808 (although Elizabeth had filed other papers contending that the date was 5/10/1809). Jesse Chaney and Henry Creutzberg affirmed Elizabeth's loyalty. These same two gentlemen would later assist Elizabeth's son George Washington "Jona" Fazenbaker, daughter-in-law Jennie Fazenbaker, and many other local veterans with their Civil War pension applications, and Chaney would board and employ Elizabeth's grandson William Fazenbaker. Elizabeth's application was approved and she received a pension of $8 per month.

She died in April 1880.

        There remains much uncertainty about the number and names of the children of Jacob Fazenbaker and his wife Elizabeth. The following list is a compilation from a variety of sources: William Fazenbaker (born about 1810), John Fazenbaker (born within several years of 1810), Ann "Annie" Fazenbaker (born in 1817), Grace Fazenbaker (born about 10/5/1823), Elizabeth Fazenbaker (born about 1827), Andrew Jackson "Jack" Fazenbaker (born in the 1820s), Mary Fazenbaker (born in the 1820s), and George Washington "Jona" Fazenbaker (born in the 1830s). There could well have been other children.

Three daughters of this family married men with the surname Layton. Daughter Grace Fazenbaker married John Layton; daughter Elizabeth Fazenbaker married William Layton; and daughter Mary Fazenbaker married Peter Layton as her second husband. Whether there was any kinship between the Layton men is not known. Some or all of these men might be connected to the family of James Layton which resided in the vicinity. A Layton family historian would perform a welcome service by researching the Laytons.

          Charles E. Hoye, in his 1938 Mountain Democrat article on the Fazenbakers, listed four sons of Jacob Fazenbaker--John, William, Alvey, and George--but omitted the name Jack (Andrew Jackson "Jack" Fazenbaker). No record of an Alvey of this generation has been found, but it may be appropriate to speculate that Hoye's source may have had Jack in mind, mistakenly applying a form of the name of one of Jack's own sons, Alban, with whom Jack's widow, Jennie, lived the last years of her life.

Marcus Fazenbaker and Jane "Jennie" (Broadwater)

 

        Marcus Fazenbaker was born 12/25/1805, son of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. He married Jane "Jennie" Broadwater who was born about 1809. According to genealogist Wayne Bittinger, it is likely, though not certain, that Jane was a daughter of Guy Broadwater.

        Marcus was a farmer. He inherited a share of his father's estate. On 2/7/1828, Marcus together with his brothers George and Conrad and sister "Sally" sold their interest in their father's two Military Lots to Godfrey Fazenbaker.

        At the time of the 1830 census, Marcus headed a household of four people. At the time of the 1840 census, Marcus headed a household of eight people. The numbers and age brackets match all of Marcus' known children as of 1840. The census reported that one person in the household was involved in agriculture.

At the time of the 1850 census, Marcus headed a family of 10 people. The 1850 census was the first federal census to list the names of each member of the household. Besides Marcus and Jane, the household that year included sons Jesse (age 18), Jefferson (age 16), Ephriam (age 14), Otho (age 11), Marcus (age 9), and Patrick (age 7), daughter Charlotte (age 5) and son Oliver (age 2).

At the time of the 1860 census, Marcus was head of a household in Allegany County which included Jane and six children: sons Jefferson (age 26), Otha (age 22), and Marcus (age 20), daughter Charlotte (age 15), son Oliver (age 13), and daughter Rebecca (age 9).

        At the time of the 1870 census, Marcus was head of a household of five people. Besides Marcus and wife Jane, the household included son Oliver, age 22. In addition, the household included Marcus's widowed daughter Rebecca Johnson, age 18, and her daughter Jenny, age 1. Marcus' occupation was listed as farmer.

         At the time of the 1880 census, Marcus was head of a household in Garrett County which included wife Jane, son Oliver, daughter Rebecca "Becka" Frumhart, and Becka's children James Frumhart (age 3), and Jennie Johnson (age 11). Marcus farmed at Firm Rock in Garrett County.

        On 1/22/1886, Marcus signed his will. He left his farm and personal property to his wife Jane for the rest of her life. Then son Oliver was to have the farm after he paid the following sums to Marcus' other children: $146 to son Marcus M. Facenbaker; $200 to daughter Rebecca Fromhart; $200 to daughter Nancy Michael, $100 to son "Ephriam"; $1 to son "Oath"; $1 to son Jesse; $1 to daughter "Sharlotte" Patrick; $1 to son Jefferson; and $1 to daughter "Senith" Wilson.

         He died 4/11/1886 at the age of eighty-one years, 3 months, and 20 days, according to his marker at the family cemetery on his property. Jane died 2/27/1895.

         Fazenbaker family historian Louis Hicks in his "27th Article" about the Fazenbaker family reported on the ownership of Marcus' farm at Firm Rock in eastern Garrett County up through 1977, "Marcus left it to son Oliver. Oliver to his son Ernest. And Ernest's son Junior now has it."

          Children of Marcus and Jane: Ascenith E. Fazenbaker (born about 1828); Nancy Fazenbaker (born 10/30/1827); Jesse (or Jessie) Franklin Fazenbaker (born 11/27/1832); Jefferson S. Facenbaker (born 4/22/1834); Ephriam Fazenbaker (born in 1836); Otho Harmon "Othey" or "Otha" Fazenbaker (born 4/18/1838); Marcus Manuel (or Manual) "Squire Marks" Fazenbaker (born 9/15/1840); Patrick Stephen Fazenbaker (born 12/8/1843); Charlotte Ann "Sis" Fazenbaker (born 3/10/1845); Oliver Fazenbaker (born 5/17/1846); and Rebecca Jane "Becka" Fazenbaker (born 2/8/1852).

Sarah "Sally" Fazenbaker, wife of Henry Clouse and John Barnes

 

        Sarah "Sally" Fazenbaker was born about 1789, daughter of the Hessian soldier George Fazenbaker. On 3/9/1806 at the Methodist Church in Cumberland, she married 1) Henry Clouse. At the time of the 1810 census, Henry Clouse was head of household in Allegany County. He received payment from the estate of James Evan on 10/13/1810.

        According to family tradition passed down by great-granddaughter Daisy Lamb through ggg-grandaughter Harriott Ivers of Beaumont, Texas, Henry and a son were killed when a bridge collapsed. Most of the features of the family tradition passed down by Daisy that can be checked appear accurate. For example, family tradition correctly recorded Sally's maiden name and the number of her children.

         When Henry died, James Morrison, a prominent local citizen, became the administrator for the estate. We do not know the date of the first accounting, but the second accounting occurred 8/30/1820, and one Elizabeth Fazenbaker, believed to be Sally's widowed mother, received a share. On 1/22/1823, Elizabeth received the substantial sum of $116.57 from Henry's estate. Neither the second nor the third accountings mentioned Henry's widow Sally, who by then had married again. Today, it is a historical curiosity that Henry's widow did not receive funds from the estate, while his mother-in-law did.

         On 6/3/1817 according to the Clerks Office of the Circuit Court of Allegany County, or on 6/9/1817 according to the Marriage Diary of Reverend William Shaw, deacon of the Methodist Episcopal Church 1792-1813, Sally married 2) John Barnes. John, who was born about 1788, was a son of William Barnes, smithy. John became the legal guardian of Sally's four children: Elizabeth Clouse, George Clouse, Philip Clouse, and "Julianna" Clouse. John had previously married Nancy Broadwater (license obtained 1/9/1813 at Cumberland), daughter of Cornelius Broadwater and Mary. John and Nancy had had a daughter Sarah "Sally" Barnes who was born about 1814. Sally Barnes married 1) William Sigler and 2) David Evans.

        When John's father William Barnes died in the early 1820s, John was one of the administrators and William's estate paid an account to brother Jacob Fazenbaker, among others.

       Sally inherited a share of her father's estate. On 2/7/1828, Sally together with her brothers GeorgeConrad, and Marcus Fazenbaker sold their interest in their father's two Military Lots to brother Godfrey Fazenbaker.

        At the time of the 1840 census, John Barnes, Sr., headed a household of 12 people in Allegany County. That census did not record the names of members of the household other than the head, and it has not been possible to reconstruct who was in the household at that time.

        At the time of the 1850 census, John and Sally were living in Allegany County. Sally died 10/10/1852. On 8/8/1853, John obtained a marriage license to marry Charity Broadwater, daughter of Guy Broadwater and Susanna Reckner, widow of James McIntire. We do not know when John died, but on 4/20/1859 one Charity Barnes, who may have been John's widow, was named in an Allegany County marriage license with William Gitterny.

        The extensive Civil War pension file for Samuel Major, husband of John and Sally's daughter Mary Ellen (Barnes) Fazenbaker Major, was a key resource which made it possible to include many of the children of this family. Children of Sally and John Barnes: Nancy Barnes (born about 1818); John Barnes (born about 1820); William Barnes (born about 1822); Joseph Barnes (born about 1825); Eliza Barnes (born 4/1/1826); Jefferson Barnes (born about October 1827); Benjamin Barnes (born 7/11/1829); and Mary Ellen Barnes (born 3/8/1833).

        John Fazenbaker and Mary "Polly" (Atkinson)

John Fazenbaker was presumably born about the early 1790s, son of George Fazenbaker.

Western Maryland historian Charles E. Hoye reported that John married in Ohio and had two children. John's wife was Mary "Polly" Atkinson. Marriage records of Coshocton County, OH, show that they were married on 12/4/1818.

He was still in Coshocton County in 1820, for in the federal census of that year he was head of a household there; the surname was spelled Fasenbaker. The household contained one male age 26 to 45 (John), one female age 16 to 26 (presumably John's wife Mary), and two females under age 10 (perhaps John's daughters). John was engaged in commerce, but not agriculture.

        No further record of John or his family has been found. Specifically, a book of marriages in Coshocton County listed no other Fazenbakers, a recent book of Coshocton County cemetery markers records no Fazenbakers, and John's name is not found in any other federal census for Ohio, the surrounding states or states westward of Ohio.

 

Bibliography

Multiple sections of this webpage are copied or summarized , with permission, from Wayne Bittinger's 1986 book, The Bittinger, Bittner, Biddinger, and Bidinger Families--and Their Kin--of Garrett County, Maryland.  

Wayne Bittinger who, over a 22-year period, compiled the most carefully researched family history of western Maryland, and perhaps elsewhere. His remarkable 1986 book (The Bittinger, Bittner, Biddinger, and Bidinger Families--and Their Kin--of Garrett County, Maryland) is a distillation of original research on many of the early families of present-day Garrett County. Its 836 pages include many stories about the pioneer generations of these families, 68 pages of photos of family members born in the early and mid-1800s, full documentation of all information, and a large index, so it's easy to find your way around the book.

Many pioneer families were related by marriage to Henry Bittinger's family. Separate histories of dozens of these are given in the book; most begin in the 1700s. Included are Baer, Baker, Bauser, Beachy, Beeghly, Blocher, Boger, Bowman, Brenneman, Broadwater, Butler, Custer, Detrick (Deitrick), Durst, Ecenbarger, Engle, Fazenbaker, Foust, Fuller, Green, Gronmuller, Handwerk, Hare, Harman, Hoover, Kerling, Lenhart, Lindeman, Lohr, Miller, Mimmie (Mimna), Orendorf, Otto, Peck, Pifer, Platter, Reckner, Ruckle, Rush, Schaaff, Shrout, Sigler, Sloan, Spiker, Stanton, Stark, Walls, Wampler, Weitzel (Weitzell), and Wiland.

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